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BEST Grant FAQ

Questions


General BEST Program Description

Accounting/Reimbursement

Facility Insight

Procurement

Delivery Methods

Other Public School Capital Construction Assistance Programs

Historical Buildings

Davis Bacon and Related Acts (DBRA) (For selected BEST Lease-Purchase Grants)

Contracts

Facility Maintenance

Other Helpful Links

 

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Answers


What is BEST?

  • Pursuant to 22-43.7-101 Thru 22-43.7-116 C.R.S., a program called Building Excellent Schools Today or BEST was established;
  • It includes a nine-member Public School Capital Construction Assistance Board (Assistance Board) who oversees what is known as the “BEST” legislation, approved by the 2008 Colorado State Legislature and Governor;
  • Establishes The Division of Public School Capital Construction Assistance (The Division) to provide technical assistance to districts, charter schools, institute charter schools, BOCES, and the Colorado School for the deaf and Blind with the BEST program;
  • The BEST legislation (House Bill 08-1335) increases the level of financial assistance provided to school districts, charter schools, institute charter schools, BOCES, and the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind for capital construction projects. The BEST legislation provides for capital projects including new schools, major renovations, additions and smaller projects;
  • The BEST legislation addresses health and safety issues (see “Who qualifies and what types of projects qualify?”) by providing funds to rebuild, repair or replace the State's most dangerous and most needy K-12 facilities. The BEST plan calls for a statewide needs assessment, an expert-guided process for the selection of schools and projects for funding;
  • The BEST program leverages revenue annually from the School Trust Lands, additional State Lottery revenues and marijuana excise taxes;
  • The School Trust Land is property the federal government granted to Colorado for the benefit of its school children upon statehood;
  • Follow this link for more information about the BEST program: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdefinance/CapConst BEST.htm

 

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What technical assistance is offered?

  • The Divisions offers technical assistance during all phases of a project, for example:
    • Pre BEST grant:
      • Targeted outreach, site visits, assistance with project identification, BEST grant application information & review, establishment of construction committee, assistance with RFQ or RFQ/P, etc.
    • Throughout BEST grant project:
      • Consultant & vendor procurement, fund request/budget review, project communication, project monitoring, grant reserves, site visits, project closeout, etc.
    • Post BEST grant:
      • Helpful information with maintenance, project management, construction review, warranty, O&M manuals, etc.

 

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How do I contact the Division staff?

 

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Who qualifies and what types of projects qualify?

  • School districts, Charter schools, Institute charter schools, BOCES, and The Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind qualify for BEST;
  • Colorado school districts – all Colorado school districts are eligible for BEST funding. The application must come from the district level, not the individual school level;
  • Eligible charter schools – an eligible charter school is one that has been chartered for at least three years from the date of the grant application. Pursuant to 22-43.7-109(b) C.R.S., the Board may only provide financial assistance to public schools which meet this three-year criteria;
  • Eligible institute charter schools – same requirements as a school district charter school;
  • Eligible boards of cooperative educational services (BOCES) – All BOCES that are eligible to receive state moneys pursuant to 22-5-114 C.R.S.;
  • Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind;
  • Pursuant to 22-43.7-109 (5) C.R.S. projects qualify and are prioritized as follows:
    • Projects that address safety hazards or health concerns at existing public school facilities, including public school facility security;
      • Projects that incorporate technology into the educational environment;
    • Projects that relieve overcrowding in public school facilities, including but not limited to projects that will allow students to move from temporary instructional facilities into permanent facilities;
    • All other projects.

 

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What is the Assistance Board?

  • A Public School Capital Construction Assistance Board (CCAB or Assistance Board) is created in 22-43.7-106 C.R.S.;
  • CCAB consists of nine appointed members who serve terms of two years and may serve up to three terms. The State Board shall appoint three members from different areas of the state and from urban, suburban, and rural school districts. The members appointed by the State Board shall all have demonstrated experience regarding public school facility issues and shall include:
    • One member who is a school district board member at the time of appointment;
    • One member who is public school superintendent or administrator at the time of appointment or has recent experience as a public school superintendent or administrator;
    • One member who is a school facilities planner or manager at the time of appointment or has recent experience as a school facilities planner or manager.
  • The governor shall appoint three members and shall include:
    • One member who is an architect whose professional practice includes the design and rehabilitation of public school facilities at the time of appointment or who has recent experience rehabilitating existing public school facilities and designing new public school facilities;
    • One member who is an engineer whose professional practice at the time of appointment includes public school facilities engineering or who has recent experience in public school facilities engineering;
    • One member who is a construction manager who at the time of appointment manages public school facilities construction projects or who has recent experience managing such projects.
  • The general assembly shall appoint three members, one of whom shall be appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives, one of whom shall be appointed by the president of the senate, and one of whom shall be appointed jointly by the minority leaders of the House of Representatives and the senate. The members appointed by the general assembly shall include:
    • One member who is a school facilities planner or manager at the time of appointment or has recent experience as a school facilities planner or manager;
    • One member who has expertise in technology, including but not limited to technology for individual student learning and classroom instruction;
    • One member who has public school finance expertise and knowledge regarding public school trust lands.
  • View CCAB information

 

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What is the specific program timeline?

 

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What is the Assistance Fund?

  • The public school capital construction assistance fund created in section 22-43.7-104 C.R.S. Consists of revenues from State Land Trust, Colorado Lottery, Matching Funds, Interest on Funds and Marijuana Excise Taxes. The Assistance Fund provides the Division funding for BEST grants and staff.

 

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Is there a BEST website?

 

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What are matching funds?

  • Pursuant to 22-43.7-109 (9) C.R.S. the BEST grants are matching grants and the statute provides criteria for calculating a matching percentage;
  • Minimum Match Criteria, from statute, used to calculate a minimum match for each school district per 22-43.7-109 (9) (c) C.R.S., are as follows:
    • The school district’s assessed value per pupil relative to the state average;
    • The school district’s median household income relative to the state average;
    • The school district’s bond redemption fund mill levy relative to the statewide average;
    • The percentage of pupils enrolled in the school district who are eligible for free and/or reduced-cost lunch;
    • The school district's current available bond capacity remaining;
    • The school district's unreserved fund balance as a percentage of its annual budget;
    • Bond election effort and success over the last 10 years.
  • Minimum Match Criteria, from statute, used to calculate a minimum match for each Charter School and Institute Charter School are as follows:
    • Starting Point:
      • The starting point will be the weighted average district matches of the student body of the charter school. For example if 40% of the charter school population come from district X and 60% comes from district Y the starting point will be a weighted average of the two district matches. This is used since district match is comprised of household income, PPAV, district FRED, Mill Levy and Bonding history. If it is a CSI school the starting point will be half of the statewide BEST district matching average.
    • Adjustment Factors:
      • Does your authorizing district have 10% or less bonding capacity remaining?
        • This is used as an adjustment factor to look at the charter schools ability to provide a match through a district bond election. If the charter school is a CSI charter school their response will automatically be N/A and no adjustment will be made.
      • Is the charter school in a district owned facility?
        • This is considered since charter schools in district owned facilities are not required to pay rent or a lease.
      • Over the last 10 years how many times has the charter school attempted to get or attained bond proceeds from an Authorizer's ballot measure for capital needs?
        • This is an adjustment factor to evaluate the charter schools past effort to help themselves without State assistance. The number they report needs to be validated by evidence of effort i.e. ballot questions, emails, meeting minutes etc. If the school is a CSI charter school their response will be N/A and no adjustment will be made.
      • Over the last 10 years how many times has the charter school attempted to do a special mill levy override pursuant to 22-30.5-405 for capital needs?
        • This is an adjustment factor to evaluate the charter schools past effort to help themselves without State assistance. The number they report needs to be validated by evidence of effort i.e. ballot questions, emails, meeting minutes etc. If the school is a CSI charter school their response will be N/A and no adjustment will be made.
      • Over the last 10 years how many times has the charter school attempted or attained grant funding through a non-BEST source for capital needs?
        • This is an adjustment factor to evaluate the charter schools past effort to help themselves without State assistance. The grants they apply for need to be grants for capital needs in which they were not only eligible for but also good candidates for receipt of funds. The number they report needs to be validated by evidence of effort i.e., award letters, formal non-award letters, emails, meeting minutes etc.
      • Over the last 10 years how many times has the charter school attempted or obtained funding through CECFA or another type of financing?
        • This is an adjustment factor to evaluate the charter schools past effort to help themselves without State assistance. The number they report needs to be validated by best evidence of effort i.e., award letters, formal non-award letters, application denials, emails, meeting minutes etc.
      • Charter school enrollment as a percent of district enrollment;
        • This is an adjustment factor to help evaluate the likeliness that a charter school could successfully win a special mill levy or bond election if they were the only question on the ballot.
      • Free/Reduced lunch percent in relation to the statewide average charter school free/reduced lunch percent;
        • This is an adjustment factor which helps evaluate the capabilities of the charter school through a capital campaign or savings to raise a match.
      • Percentage of Per Pupil Revenue spent on Non-Maintenance & Operations facilities costs;
        • This is an adjustment factor which looks at how much the charter school is spending on facilities and if they are allocating funds to take care of themselves.
      • Unreserved fund balance as a percent of budget;
        • This is an adjustment factor which looks at the available funds for a match. (NOTE: If the charter school has a parent foundation they need to provide the foundations fund balance as well.)
      • Final Adjusted Match Percentage
        • This is calculated by taking the starting point and adding in all the adjustment factors.
    • The final adjusted match percentage cannot be higher or lower than the highest or lowest district match for that given grant cycle;
  • The following criteria, from statute, is used to calculate a minimum match for each Board of Cooperative Services’ application for financial assistance per 22-43.7-109 C.R. S.:
    • BOCES matching percentages are calculated by taking an average of the member districts matching percentages that comprise a particular BOCES to give that BOCES a unique matching percentage.
  • Colorado School for Deaf and Blind requirements are as follows:
    • The Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind shares the same matching figures as Colorado Springs District 11.
  • View the calculated match percentages and the method for calculating the percentage

 

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What charter school requirements are there?

  • All public schools, including district charter and institute charter schools, must be in existence for at least 3 years on the date the school submits its application per 22-43.7-109 (b) C.R.S.
  • Charter School must notify its authorizer if the school applies for financial assistance per 22-43.7-109 (3) C.R.S.
  • Charter School shall submit its application directly to the board per 22-43.7-109 (3) C.R.S.
  • Charter School must notify the Division of Capital Construction no later than December 1st if it anticipates applying for BEST financial assistance -- even if it is not certain it will apply -- so that a matching percentage can be calculated for the school. This date as well as other important dates can be found on our timeline here: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdefinance/capconstgrantappprocess.

 

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What type of BEST grants are there?

  • There are two types of BEST grants:
    • BEST Cash Grants which are typically used to fund smaller projects like roofs, boiler replacements, fire alarms, etc;
    • BEST Lease Purchase Grants which are typically used to fund larger projects like new schools, major renovations, and additions. These grants are financed and the financing is paid back with future assistance fund revenues.

 

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What is a grant application?

  • The grant application is used for a competitive grant process for K-12 Schools, Charter Schools, BOCES, and Colorado Schools for the Deaf and Blind;
  • View the CC-03 Grant Application form

 

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What is the definition of a public school facility?

  • “Public School Facility” means a building or portion of a building used for educational purposes by a school district, a Board of Cooperative Services, the Colorado School for The Deaf and Blind created and existing pursuant to section 22-80-102 (1) (a) C.R.S., or a charter school, including but not limited to the school sites, classrooms, libraries and media centers, cafeterias and kitchens, auditoriums, multipurpose rooms, and other multi use spaces; except that “Public School Facility” does not include a learning center, as defined in section 22-30.7-102 (4), that is not used for any other public school purpose and is not part of a building otherwise owned, or leased in its entirety, by a school district, a Board of Cooperative Services, a charter school, or the Colorado School for The Deaf and Blind for educational purposes.

 

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What are the Public School Facility Guidelines "Construction Guidelines"?

  • 22-43.7-106(1)(a) C.R.S., the Assistance Board shall establish Public School Facility Construction Guidelines for use by the Assistance Board in assessing and prioritizing public school capital construction needs throughout the State pursuant to 22-43.7-108 C.R.S.; reviewing applications for financial assistance, and making recommendations to the State Board regarding appropriate allocation of awards of financial assistance from the assistance fund only to applicants;
  • These Guidelines are not mandatory standards to be imposed on school districts, charter schools, institute charter schools, the Boards of Cooperative Services or the Colorado School for The Deaf and Blind. As required by statute, the Guidelines address:
    • Health and safety issues, including security needs and all applicable health, safety and environmental codes and standards as required by state and federal law;
    • Technology, including but not limited to telecommunications and internet connectivity technology and technology for individual student learning and classroom instruction;
    • Building site requirements;
    • Building performance standards and guidelines for green building and energy efficiency;
    • Functionality of existing and planned public school facilities for core educational programs, particularly those educational programs for which the State Board has adopted state model content standards;
    • Capacity of existing and planned public school facilities, taking into consideration potential expansion of services and programs;
    • Public school facility accessibility;
    • The historic significance of existing public school facilities and their potential to meet current programming needs by rehabilitating such facilities.
  • View the Construction Guidelines for more information

 

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What legislation and rules apply?

 

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Are there project specific policies?

  • Applications for roof grants require:
    • Clear specifications open to multiple manufacturers;
    • Competitive bid on specifications;
    • An enforceable material and labor warranty from the manufacturer and installer;
      • Installer must comply with all manufacturer requirements and inspections;
      • Owner must budget and comply with all manufacturer and installer requirements to maintain warranty.
    • Owner must include a maintenance plan and certify it will adhere to it. The plan must meet or exceed the warranty requirements;
    • Owner must agree to plan and budget for next roof replacement;
    • View the roof policy
  • Security Cameras:
    • Over the past decade since the Columbine tragedy in 2000, there has been increased interest in security on school campuses. Based on the most recent grant cycles and discussions with school districts, there is interest from Colorado school districts in seeking BEST funding for security needs;
    • Per the request of the Assistance Board to offer recommendations regarding the support of funding for security cameras in schools, the following information is provided to offer suggested guidelines regarding school district applications for security cameras;
    • During a review of available information regarding school security, the following comments from the U.S. Department of Education, The Safe and Responsive Schools Project (2003) seemed relevant to this subject:
      • The greatest asset that a security camera system offers to a school’s security personnel is the deterrence factor it introduces to outsiders that do not belong on campus and to students and employees who do. It is assumed that information regarding safety measures, such as security cameras, will spread through a community. This type of reputation can make outsiders reconsider approaching the school, and also cause most students to reconsider committing offenses in areas monitored by cameras. Nevertheless, some of the most serious incidents of school violence have occurred in spite of security camera system.
    • And yet, further on the article states that there is no empirical research that validates that the presence of security cameras effectively decreases violence and crime in school settings. It also states that each school should evaluate the use of technology according to whether this would be a helpful tool, rather than definitively stating that all schools should install security cameras;
    • In an article by American School & University dated February 1, 2009, there are 5 mistakes noted that educational institutions make in regard to security technology;
      • These mistakes include:
        • Believing what you read and hear;
        • Thinking technology will solve security problems;
        • Insufficient planning;
        • Leaving out critical stakeholders;
        • Deploying more technology than necessary.
    • “Prevention, intervention and crisis response are key in creating a comprehensive response to preventing school violence,” says the Center for Prevention of School Violence, based in North Carolina;
    • Because of research that both supports and questions the use of security cameras in schools, staff has considered and recommends the following:
      • In preparing for the grant application, Division staff work with the school district to develop a security program that evaluates multiple security measures and tools prior to implementing new technology. This may include, but not be limited to: the school’s plan for security cameras, access control, fire and intrusion alarms, bell systems, phones, and intercoms. It may also include review and discussion of the school’s current crisis response plan including coordination with local law enforcement, and the ability of the district to implement appropriate technology for the district, utilize new and existing technology, train staff, and maintain the system(s) over time;
      • Staff has generated a questionnaire to be filled out and submitted with the grant application in demonstrating that appropriate planning was completed in order to develop an adequate security program. Staff will then review the security program provided by the district and subsequently provide a recommendation to the Assistance Board that takes into consideration the individual needs of each school district. View the questionnaire.

 

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How do I apply for reimbursement of funds?

  • View the request for funds form, CC-06 Funding Request
  • Fund requests can be made once a month to receive reimbursement for invoices from vendors. The grantee may not submit invoices or utilize unused project funds for goods or services that do not directly relate to the scope listed in the grant application. In order to process a request, the Division must receive a completed CC-06 Funding Request form with copies of associated vendor invoices (no purchase orders or proposals will be accepted) along with W-9 Forms (if lease purchase grant) for listed vendors. The Division will make every effort to assure short turnaround time from the time the request is received to the actual issuance of checks to the vendors (for lease purchase grant) or Grantee (for cash grant);
  • The Division will NOT reimburse funds for consumables, applicant’s staff labor, tax, software or non-approved FF&E.
  • View a step-by-step tutorial and process flow charts

 

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What are the accounting codes?

  • To record BEST grant revenue use source code 3000 and grant/project code 3189;
  • To record BEST grant expenditures use grant/project 3189 and appropriate object such as capital outlay.

 

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What is an allowance?

  • An allowance is an amount of funding set aside for a specific purpose, of which the exact amount is not or cannot be known at the time of the grant application. Allowances should be clearly identified in the budget. An example of an allowance item on some BEST projects is the amount a project allocates to Davis-Bacon costs. Other examples of allowance items may be winter conditions, FF&E (furniture, fixtures, and equipment) costs, demolition costs, or unusual site costs such as installation of a traffic light;
  • Amounts allocated to an allowance cannot be used for other items in the budget. If an allowance amount is not spent on the item it has been allocated to, the additional budget amount is not allowed to be used for another scope of work in the grant, should not be billed to the grant, and should be clearly noted as ‘unused’ in project documentation. The unused amount then returns to the BEST assistance fund;
  • Please consult your CDE regional representative with any questions regarding allowances and usage of allowances;
  • For more information regarding allowances read the “Allowances In Construction Contracts” article.

 

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What are consumables?

  • Consumables for an applicant consist of anything an applicant purchases for the project but is not permanently installed into the project and can be retained by the applicant after completion. An example of this would be the applicant purchases paint, paint brushes, caulking, caulking guns, and ladders. The only items eligible for reimbursement by the Division would be the paint and caulk. The other items would NOT be reimbursed.
  • Consumables are different for a contractor that is contracted with the applicant to perform a task. Using a similar example of a painter who had bid the work, their price should include all of the tools and equipment to get the job done. So the caulking guns, ladders, and paint brushes, along with the paint and caulk would be acceptable for reimbursement by the Division.

 

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What FF&E (furniture, fixtures, and equipment) are allowed to be reimbursed?

 

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What is applicant's staff labor?

  • Applicant staff labor is using people that are employed by the applicant to complete a task for the project, typically above and beyond their usual position duties;
  • An example would be having staff come in to install Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment (FF&E);
  • Another example would be paying staff overtime to move equipment, supplies, etc. from the old building to the new project building;
  • This would be acceptable if the staff labor was donated and not expected to be reimbursed by the Division;
  • The Division will NOT reimburse funds spent for applicant’s staff labor.

 

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What happens to remaining project funds?

  • The grantee may not utilize unused project funds for goods or services which do not directly relate to the scope listed in the grant application;
  • If there comes a point in the project where the grantee and Division representative feel comfortable releasing all or a portion of their contingency amounts, the funds can be used to enhance the scope listed in the grant application;
  • Adding additional scope will not be accepted and if a request for funds is submitted with changes made beyond the original scope, that portion of the pay request will be rejected;
  • At no time can the Division’s grant reserve be used for the above.

 

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What is a grant reserve and how can I use it?

  • A grant reserve will not be calculated into the project costs or contemplated during the grant application phase;
  • The CCAB will review projects with a project budget not inclusive of the grant reserve;
  • The CCAB will recommend projects to the State Board and will also request authorization to use up to 10% of project funds to address grant reserves if they occur;
  • Grantees will complete a grant reserve application and submit it to Division for initial review;
  • The Division will submit the grant reserve request to the CCAB as an action item at the next board meeting;
  • CCAB will review the grant reserve application and make a motion to approve or deny authorization of additional funds;
  • If approved, the Division will modify the grant to include the additional funding;
  • The total approval cannot exceed more than 10% of the total project costs;
  • There will be a grantee matching obligation towards the grant reserve request.

 

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Can I tell which source of revenue my grant was funded from?

  • No, all of the revenue for the BEST program is deposited into one general fund, called the assistance fund. All awarded cash grants come from this one central fund therefore there is no way of denoting which revenue source was used towards a specific grant project.

 

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What is the statewide facility assessment “Facility Insight”?

  • In 2008, the Assistance Board was required by 22-43.7-108 C.R.S. to conduct an assessment of all public schools in the state of Colorado. In 2015, the state legislation was passed to reassess all public schools in the state of Colorado through Facility Insight. The condition assessment and adequacy survey shall assess public school facilities based on:
    • The condition of the public school facility;
    • Water quality in the public school facility;
    • Public school facility space requirements;
    • The ability to accommodate educational technology, including but not limited to technology from individual student learning and classroom instruction;
    • Site requirements for the public school facility;
    • Public school facility demographics, including a five-year projection concerning anticipated substantial changes in the pupil count of individual public school facilities.
  • The condition assessment shall include five-year projections regarding the issues;
  • The Board shall use the public school facility construction guidelines established pursuant to section 22-43.7-107 C.R.S. in conducting the financial assistance priority assessment described in this section;
  • The Board, or the Division upon the Board’s request, shall establish a database to store the data collected through the financial assistance priority assessment conducted pursuant to 22-43.7-108 C.R.S. The Board or the Division shall make the data collected available to the public in a form that is easily accessible and complies with any federal or state laws or regulations concerning privacy;
  • The information collected will be used to query data and develop detailed reports, to provide strategic facility planning information and to provide analysis for school boards to make educated decisions. The Assistance Board will also use this information to help make and educated decision when awarding grant applications;
  • The assessment will commence in July 2016 and undergo a refresh every 3 years;
  • View more information about the assessment

 

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How should consultants and vendors be selected?

  • Consultants and vendors that may be involved with a BEST funded project should be selected based on a fair and competitive process that is open to the public and incorporates, but is not limited to the guidelines in this section;
  • Results of the selection process should be shared publicly and all information should be shared with candidates that propose;
  • The applicant will provide both a decision memorandum and a scoring matrix to each of the candidates;
  • The decision memorandum should outline the process that the applicant underwent in order to make their selection. It should include, but is not limited to: number of responses, number and names of candidates selected to interview, selection committee members, dates of meetings, whether the board was involved in/approved the decision, and any other factors that affected the process. The memorandum should be written so that someone who was not engaged in the process would understand fully the process that the district went through in order to make their decision. A sample decision memorandum may be requested by the applicant from their Division representative;
  • A scoring matrix clearly listing the scores of each candidate and specific scores that each candidate rated on each of the criteria is also to be forwarded to each of the candidates that responded. It should be provided in spreadsheet format with totals clearly indicating the scores of each candidate, and showing the total points available for each of the listed criteria;
  • Both the decision memorandum and the scoring matrix should be sent out within one week of the applicant’s selection, with the Division representative copied on the correspondence;
  • Applicant should consult their Division representative with any questions on the above or to obtain copies of RFQ/P templates.
  • Please reference the BEST Consultant/Contractor Selection Guidelines

 

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What is Master Planning?

  • A Master Plan is a comprehensive long range plan intended to guide growth and development. It includes analysis, recommendations, and proposals incorporating: the State Facilities Assessment, economy, housing, transportation, community facilities, and land use. It is based on Owner input, surveys, planning initiatives, existing development, physical characteristics, and social and economic conditions;
  • Work closely with your Division representative through this process;
  • Reference the School Facilities Master Plan Guidelines

 

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What is an Owner's Representative?

  • An Owner’s Representative is the person designated as the official representative of the Owner (also known as Construction Manager). They work with the Owner’s best interests in mind. Owner’s representatives usually have experience in both design and construction, using their experiences to solve problems and offer solutions. The owner’s rep will control the overall coordination effort between the design team members. During construction they spend significant time on the construction site to recognizing and solving conflicts. When complicated issues arise, the owner’s rep will explore all of the options, condense the information, and provide the owner with options, along with a recommended course of action;
  • Reference the Owner’s Representative Job Description

 

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What is an RFQ or RFQ/P and how is it scored?

  • RFQ stands for Request for Qualifications or RFQ/P stands for Request for Qualifications & Proposal;
  • It is scored on a number of criteria set forth in the RFQ or RFQ/P and is based off of but not limited to the selection criteria set forth in the BEST RFQ/P templates;
  • Contact your Division representative for assistance;
  • A copy of a RFQ/P template and a scoring model can be requested from your Division representative.

 

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Where should I advertise the RFQ or RFQ/P?

  • There are a number of location to advertise including:
    • The CCA List Serve;
    • The Dodge Report;
    • The RFQ or RFQ/P announcement should be posted or accessible on the applicants website or equivalent;
    • Also consider local newspapers or other local media.

 

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What is the "CCA List Serve" and how do I get on the list?

 

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What is a delivery method?

  • The methods used to design and construct a project. There are three typical delivery methods: Design/Bid/Build, CM/GC or CM At-Risk, and Design Build.

 

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What is Design/Bid/Build?

  • A delivery method in which the owner contracts with separate entities for the design and construction of a project;
  • Design/bid/build is the traditional method for project delivery;
  • There are three main phases to the design/bid/build delivery method:
    • The design phase;
    • The bidding phase;
    • The construction phase.
  • Advantages of Design/Bid/Build include:
    • The design team is impartial to the contractor;
    • The design team prepares documents on which all general contractors place bids;
    • Guarantees fairness to potential bidders and helps decision making for the owner by providing options. It also identifies new potential contractors;
    • Assists the owner in establishing reasonable prices for the project;
    • Uses competition to improve the efficiency and quality for owners;
  • Disadvantages of Design/Bid/Build include:
    • If the design team is not current with construction costs and/or costs increases during the design phase delays could occur if the construction documents must be redone to reduce costs;
    • Since contractor is brought on board after design, there is little opportunity for input on alternates being presented by the design team, help with cost estimating, or cost savings;
    • Pressures on the design and construction teams may lead to disputes between the architect and the general contractor;
    • Design/Bid/Build can lead to de-value engineering, which may cut the scope of the project so budgets can be met.

 

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What is Design/Build?

  • A delivery method where the design and construction consultants are contracted with a single company as the design/builder or design/build contractor. The design-builder can be the general contractor, but in many cases it is also the design professional. It will minimize the project risk for the owner and reduce the schedule by overlapping the design phase and construction phase. Where the design-builder is the contractor, the design professionals are contracted directly with the contractor;
  • Advantages of Design/Build:
    • The design/build method is not focused on saving the owner construction costs only, but saves the owner money on the overall project;
    • Improved communication between the project team and the owner;
    • Single source project delivery;
    • More accountability of the project team;
    • Less "finger-pointing" that sometimes happens with other delivery methods;
    • Allows the owner to look to one company with any questions or concerns.
    • Provides Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) for the design;
    • Can lead to full scope of the project being completed through collaboration.
  • Disadvantages of Design/Build:
    • Premature cost estimating;
    • Short-cut design process;
    • Decreased accountability by the service provider;
      • The design-builder is given a lot of control over the entire process, how the project is organized and how it is completed. With no third-party such as an independent architect to watch over the process, the design-builder could sacrifice the quality of materials and systems such as HVAC, lighting, plumbing, and even structural elements in order to help their profits.
    • Correction of work.
      • Since the owner may not have the expertise to evaluate the quality of the work, they must trust the design-builder to design a facility that will meet the needs of the owner, and execute the design correctly, according to codes, and consistent with industry-standards. If the design/builder does not agree with the owner's evaluation, the owner might not be able to insist on correction of work done poorly and may need some form of formal dispute such as litigation, or arbitration;
      • The owner takes on the responsibility to review contract documents, such as plans, specifications, and contracts, and to hold the design/builder accountable to the design and quality control.

 

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What is CM/GC or CM At-Risk?

  • CM/GC stands for Construction Manager/General Contractor. This refers to the role the contractor plays in the negotiated process where the contractor provides both preconstruction and construction services;
  • With CM/GC the owner holds the contract for both the design consultant and the contractor;
  • CM/GC is similar to Design/Bid/Build but brings the contractor on earlier to assist with many aspects of the project;
  • Advantages of CM/GC include:
    • Owner is in charge of decisions;
    • Cost savings is kept with the owner;
    • Method is a combination of Design/Bid/Build & Design/Build;
    • Speed of delivery;
      • CM/GC is brought on early enabling them to begin the project earlier, help the design team with cost estimating, and overlap design and construction.
    • Reduced risk to the owner;
      • Involving the contractor with design helps improve constructability.
    • Increased communication between Contractor and Design Team;
    • Value engineering participation by the contractor;
    • Design flaws and omissions are discovered early with peer reviews by the contractor;
    • Provides Guaranteed Maximum Price (GMP) for the design.
  • Disadvantages of CM/GC include:
    • No construction price knowledge prior to hiring contractor;
    • Sometimes contractors first estimate is significantly higher than the design team;
    • In spite of the name CM/GC contract does not provide the Owner with a CM acting in the Owner’s behalf.

 

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What is the High Performance Certification Program (HPCP)?

  • Pursuant to 24-30-1301 C.R.S. projects that meet certain criteria must comply with the HPCP administered by the State Architect. HPCP requires qualifying projects to target LEED Gold or CO-CHPS.

 

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What is a Capital Renewal Reserve?

  • Pursuant to 22-43.7-109 (4) (d) (I) C.R.S. recipients of BEST grants that involves the construction of a new public school facility or a major renovation of an existing public school facility must establish a capital renewal reserve fund.
    • Capital renewal is not the same as maintenance;
    • "Capital renewal reserve" means moneys set aside by an applicant for the specific purpose of replacing major public school facility systems with projected life cycles such as roofs, interior finishes, electrical systems and heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems;
    • Applicants at a minimum must establish a capital renewal budget and commit to making annual contributions to a capital renewal reserve fund starting the fiscal year after occupancy.

 

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What is an Emergency Grant?

  • Pursuant to 22-43.7-104 (4) C.R.S. for each fiscal year commencing on or after July 1, 2008 an emergency reserve of at least one million dollars shall be maintained in the assistance fund to be used for a public school facility emergency in accordance with section 22-43.7-109 (8) C.R.S.;
  • “Public school facility emergency” means an unanticipated event that makes all or a significant portion of the building unusable for educational purposes or threatens the health or safety of the people using the facility.

 

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What is a Charter School Capital Construction Grant?

  • Each year the State Education Fund provides an appropriation for Charter School and Institute Charter School Capital Construction. This funding can be used by the Charter School or Institute Charter School to pay for school construction, renovation, maintaining, financing, purchasing or leasing of facilities. The purpose of this funding is to promote a safe and healthy learning environment for all Colorado students. The Charter School Capital Construction Funds Can Not Be Used For: Routine maintenance such as custodial work, mowing, tree trimming, cleaning, etc; Purchase of furnishings or equipment, unless the items are FF&E for new space funded with the capital construction funds;
  • All Charter Schools and Institute Charter Schools in the State must submit a CSCC-02 - "Charter School Capital Construction Funding Eligibility Questionnaire" to the Department;
  • To Be Eligible for Charter School Capital Construction Funds a Charter School Must:
    • HAVE capital construction needs;
    • IF located in a district owned facility with construction needs, pupils will count as .5 FTE;
    • ON-LINE pupils will not be counted;
    • IF in a State owned facility must be paying rent and have capital construction needs to be eligible. Not eligible, IF in a State owned facility and not paying rent or there are not capital construction needs.
  • Payments are made on a monthly basis with the first six months payments being based on prior year FTE projections. Upon completion of the CSCC-02 "Charter School Capital Construction Funding Eligibility Questionnaire" and verification of the current year October pupil counts, an adjustment will be made to the monthly payment and distribution schedule to reflect actual FTE numbers;
  • On July 31 of each year a form must be submitted, CSCC-01, reporting how much of the funding was spent and what it was spent on. If any of the grant funding was not used it must show in financial statements as deferred revenue, using grant code 3113, if the expenditure delay is approved by CDE, or it may have to be returned;
  • Remember, in order to qualify, certification was provided that there were capital construction needs. If the money isn't used, future funding may be withheld;
  • View the Charter Schools page for forms and other related information.

 

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What is QZAB?

  • The QZAB (Qualified Zone Academy Bond) program is a program that offers interest-free financing to schools for the purpose of repair and renovation projects for school districts. The benefit of the QZAB program is that it helps school districts save money and make their dollars go further. School districts usually issue bonds in order to finance renovation and repair projects to schools within the district. Interest owed on these bonds can equal up to 50 percent of the costs of the entire project. As a result, districts often find it difficult to undertake school renovation and repair;
  • In order to facilitate these projects, US Congress created the Federal QZAB program, which provides the bondholder with a federal tax credit in lieu of a cash interest payment. Because the federal government provides the interest payment, the district then is typically only responsible for repaying the principle value of the bond. Through this program, the burden on school districts of financing school renovation is eased. QZAB allocations are available on a first-come basis upon review and approval of the QZAB application;
  • For more information, please review the QZAB FAQ sheet and the QZAB application

 

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What is Full-Day-Kindergarten (FDK)?

  • HB08-1388 established a program to assist with facility needs required to provide FDK programs. The funding was pulled and although the program still exists funding has not been reinstated.

 

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What projects are required to comply with Colorado Historical Society (CHS) requirements?

  • Colorado statute 24-80.1-101 to 108 C.R.S. requires state agencies such as the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) to consult with and take into consideration the comments of the Colorado Historical Society (CHS) on projects involving properties listed on the State Register of Historic Properties or properties having historical significance to determine if the project would result in an adverse effect to the property. For the purposes of the BEST grant program, the Division and CHS are evaluating properties that are over 50 years old to determine if they are eligible for listing on the State Register if they are not already listed.

 

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What is required of buildings that are over 50 years old?

  • At the earliest stages of planning, the Division must submit a request for a determination of historical significance for the building per 24-80.1-104 C.R.S. School districts need to notify the Division at the earliest stages of project planning that there may be an effect to a historical building(s). The Division will consult with the CHS on the school district’s behalf regarding what actions will be permitted by the CHS.

 

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If a building is not registered as a historic building, does 24-80.1-104 C.R.S. still apply?

  • Yes

 

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Is there an appeal process if the school district does not agree with the CHS determination of effect?

  • Yes, there is an appeal process. Pursuant to 24-80.1-104 C.R.S.:
    • (1) Properties nominated for inclusion in or accepted by the state register shall be protected from any action initiated by a state agency until a final determination concerning the effect of such action on such properties is made pursuant to subsection (2) of this section.
    • (2) (a) At the earliest stage of planning or consideration of a proposed action or when it is anticipated that properties of historical significance may be adversely affected in the course of an agency action and in all cases prior to an agency decision concerning an action that may have an effect on properties listed in the state register, the agency initiating the action shall identify such properties located within the area of the proposed action, notify the society of the proposed action, request a determination of effect on such properties, and afford the society a period of thirty days in which to review the proposed action. Notification shall include sufficient and relevant information needed to make a determination of effect. Comments made by the society which include specific recommendations to prohibit or alter all or some aspects of the proposed action shall be implemented by the agency subject to paragraphs (b) and (c) of this subsection (2).
      • (b) If the agency rejects some or all of the comments of the society relative to the proposed action, the agency shall be afforded a period of thirty days during which to negotiate a satisfactory agreement with the society.
      • (c) If no agreement is reached or if any party to any such agreement is dissatisfied therewith, an appeal may be made to the governor for a final determination. The governor shall make such determination within thirty days after such appeal.

 

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What is Davis Bacon and Related Acts?

  • The Davis-Bacon Act requires that all contractors and subcontractors performing on federal contracts (and contractors or subcontractors performing on federally assisted contracts under the related Acts) in excess of $2,000 pay their laborers and mechanics not less than the prevailing wage rates and fringe benefits listed in the contract’s Davis-Bacon wage determination for corresponding classes of laborers and mechanics employed on similar projects in the area. Davis-Bacon labor standards clauses must be included in covered contracts;
  • Apprentices may be employed at less than predetermined rates if they are in an apprenticeship program registered with the Department of Labor or with a state apprenticeship agency recognized by the Department. Trainees may be employed at less than predetermined rates if they are in a training program certified by the Department;
  • Contractors and subcontractors on prime contracts in excess of $100,000 are required, pursuant to the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act, to pay employees one and one-half times their basic rates of pay for all hours over 40 worked on covered contract work in a workweek. Covered contractors and subcontractors are also required to pay employees weekly and to submit weekly certified payroll records to the contracting agency;
  •  
  • CDE DBRA information

 

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What is Wage Determination (WD)?

 

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What are certified payrolls?

  • Under the DBRA, covered contractors must maintain payroll and basic records for all laborers and mechanics during the course of the work and for a period of three years thereafter. Records to be maintained include:
    • Name, address, and Social Security number of each employee;
    • Each employee's work classifications;
    • Hourly rates of pay, including rates of contributions or costs anticipated for fringe benefits or their cash equivalents;
    • Daily and weekly numbers of hours worked;
    • Deductions made;
    • Actual wages paid;
    • If applicable, detailed information regarding various fringe benefit plans and programs, including records that show that the plan or program has been communicated in writing to the laborers and mechanics affected;
    • If applicable, detailed information regarding approved apprenticeship or trainee programs.
  • Each covered contractor and subcontractor must, on a weekly basis, provide the federal agency a copy of all payrolls providing the information listed above under for the preceding weekly payroll period. Each payroll submitted must be accompanied by a “Statement of Compliance.” The contractor, subcontractor or the authorized officer or employee of the contractor or subcontractor who supervises the payment of wages must sign the weekly statement. Statements of Compliance are to be made on the form WH-347 "Payroll (For Contractors Optional Use)" or on any form with identical wording. This must be completed within seven days after the regular pay date for the pay period;
  • Contractors may also be asked to submit, via survey, wage data that may be used by the Wage and Hour Division to determine the locally prevailing wage rates that will apply to workers on Davis-Bacon and DBRA-covered projects. The submission of wage data is encouraged, but voluntary. Contractors and others may use the WD-10 Form, Report of Construction Contractor’s Wage Rates
  • View the WH-347 form for submitting certified payroll
  • View the WD-10 form, Report of Construction Contractor’s Wage Rates

 

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What posters do I need to post onsite?

  • Every employer performing work covered by the labor standards of the DBRA must post the WH-1321 “Employee Rights Under the Davis-Bacon Act” poster at the site of the work in a prominent and accessible place where it may be easily seen by employees. There is no particular size requirement. The wage determination must be similarly posted;
  • View the “Employee Rights Under the Davis-Bacon Act” poster
  • View the Spanish version

 

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How do you track Davis Bacon costs?

  • Cost can be tracked using the MS Excel spreadsheet provided by the Division. This spreadsheet will help calculate the added cost for the contractor required to follow the Davis Bacon guidelines. View the Excel spreadsheet

 

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What is the BEST Checklist for DBRA?

  • The checklist has been created to provide an overview of the requirements established by the Davis-Bacon and Related Acts requirements. This checklist does not substitute for the detailed provisions in the contract or the Department of Labor requirements for implementing Davis-Bacon and Related Acts requirements;
  • View the BEST Checklist for DBRA

 

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What immigration language should be included in the contract?

  • Per Immigration Law 8-17.5-101 & 102, C.R.S. (HB 06-1343). A state agency or political subdivision shall not enter into or renew a public contract for services with a contractor who:
    • Knowingly employs or contracts with an illegal alien to perform work under the contract;
    • Knowingly contracts with a subcontractor who knowingly employs or contracts with an illegal alien to perform work under the contract.
  • Prior to executing a public contract for services, each prospective contractor shall certify that, at the time of the certification:
    • It does not knowingly employ or contract with an illegal alien who will perform work under the public contract for services;
    • That the contractor will participate in the E-Verify program or the Department Program in order to confirm the employment eligibility of all employees who are newly hired for employment to perform work under the public contract for services.

 

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What Colorado/local labor requirements are there?

 

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What is the Assignment of Rights? (If Lease Purchase Grant)

  • The Sublessee hereby assigns to the State and the Trustee, and each Project Contract shall expressly provide that the State and the Trustee shall have, the right to enforce each Project Contract against the Contractor (a) following termination of this Sublease and (b) in any case where, in the reasonable judgment of the State or the Trustee, with the consent of the State, the Sublessee has failed to enforce the terms of such Project Contract in a manner consistent with the obligations of the Sublessee under this Sublease.

 

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What signage is required?

  • The building must have a permanent sign that notes where the funds were received from;
  • Sign could be in incorporated into a project dedication plaque;
  • If a temporary jobsite sign with name of project, contractor, architect, etc. is provided it shall include the same language;
  • The language should read: Funding for this school was provided through the Building Excellent Schools Today program from School Trust Lands

 

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What permitting is required?

 

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What bonds & insurance requirements are there?

  • 38-26-105. Public works contractor's bond - conditions.
    • (1) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2) of this section, any person, company, firm, or corporation entering into a contract for more than fifty thousand dollars with any county, municipality, or school district for the construction of any public building or the prosecution or completion of any public works or for repairs upon any public building or public works shall be required before commencing work to execute, in addition to all bonds that may be required of it, a penal bond with good and sufficient surety to be approved by the board or boards of county commissioners of the county or counties, the governing body or bodies of the municipality or municipalities, or the district school board or boards, conditioned that such contractor shall at all times promptly make payments of all amounts lawfully due to all persons supplying or furnishing such person or such person's subcontractors with labor, laborers, materials, rental machinery, tools, or equipment used or performed in the prosecution of the work provided for in such contract and that such contractor will indemnify and save harmless the county, municipality, or school district to the extent of any payments in connection with the carrying out of any such contract which the county or counties, municipality or municipalities, and school district or school districts may be required to make under the law. Subcontractors, materialmen, mechanics, suppliers of rental equipment, and others may have a right of action for amounts lawfully due them from the contractor or subcontractor directly against the principal and surety of such bond. Such action for laborers, materials, rental machinery, tools, or equipment furnished or labor rendered shall be brought within six months after the completion of the work and not afterwards;
    • (2) Notwithstanding the monetary qualification provided in subsection (1) of this section, the state, or the governing body of any county, municipality, school district, or other political subdivision determining it to be in the best interest of this state, or any county, municipality, school district, or other political subdivision may require the execution of a penal bond for any contract of fifty thousand dollars or less.
  • Performance Bonds – 38-26-106. Contractor executes bond.
    • (1) A contractor who is awarded a contract for more than fifty thousand dollars for the construction, erection, repair, maintenance, or improvement of any building, road, bridge, viaduct, tunnel, excavation, or other public works for any county, city and county, municipality, school district, or other political subdivision of the state, and a contractor who is awarded a contract for more than one hundred fifty thousand dollars for the construction, erection, repair, maintenance, or improvement of any building, road, bridge, viaduct, tunnel, excavation, or other public works for this state, before entering upon the performance of any such work included in the contract, shall duly execute, deliver to, and file with the board, officer, body, or person by whom the contract was awarded a good and sufficient bond or other acceptable surety approved by the contracting board, officer, body, or person, in a penal sum not less than one-half of the total amount payable under the terms of the contract; except that, for a public works contract having a total value of five hundred million dollars or more, a bond or other acceptable surety, including but not limited to a letter of credit, may be issued in a penal sum not less than one-half of the maximum amount payable under the terms of the contract in any calendar year in which the contract is performed. The contracting board, office, body, or person shall ensure that the contract requires that a bond or other acceptable surety, including but not limited to a letter of credit, be filed and current for the duration of the contract;
    • (2) A bond or other acceptable surety shall be duly executed by a qualified corporate surety or other qualified financial institution, conditioned upon the faithful performance of the contract, and, in addition, shall provide that, if the contractor or his or her subcontractor fails to duly pay for any labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender, or other supplies used or consumed by such contractor or his or her subcontractor in performance of the work contracted to be done or fails to pay any person who supplies laborers, rental machinery, tools, or equipment, all amounts due as the result of the use of such laborers, machinery, tools, or equipment, in the prosecution of the work, the surety or other qualified financial institution will pay the same in an amount not exceeding the sum specified in the bond or other acceptable surety together with interest at the rate of eight percent per annum. Unless a bond or other acceptable surety is executed, delivered, and filed, no claim in favor of the contractor arising under the contract shall be audited, allowed, or paid. A certified or cashier's check or a bank money order made payable to the treasurer of the state of Colorado or to the treasurer or other officer designated by the governing body of the contracting local government may be accepted in lieu of a bond or other acceptable surety.
  • Builder’s Risk Completed Value Insurance – The Service Provider shall procure and maintain, at its own cost and expense, standard, all risk of loss builder’s risk completed value insurance upon such property. A certificate of insurance evidencing such insurance shall be provided to the Owner and the Division;
  • General Public Liability and Property Damage Insurance – The Service Provider shall procure and maintain, at his own cost and expense, during the Service Providers Project Contract, standard form comprehensive general public liability and property damage insurance that includes coverage for (a) all claims for bodily injury, including death, and property damage; and (b) contractual liability in an amount equal to the maximum amount payable to it under its Project Contract. Such policies shall include the Owner as additional insured and shall include a provision prohibiting cancellation, termination or alteration without 30 days’ prior notice by certified mail to the Owner. A certificate of insurance evidencing such insurance shall be provided to the Owner with respect to each Service Provider within 60 days of the effective date of the related Project Contract;
  • Workers’ Compensation Insurance – The Service Provider must procure and maintain, at his own cost and expense, workers’ compensation insurance as required by Colorado law during the term of its contract, covering all persons working under its Project Contract. Such insurance, if issued by a private carrier, shall contain a provision that such coverage shall not be canceled, terminated or altered without 30 days’ prior written notice to the Owner. Certificates evidencing such coverage shall be provided to the Owner.

 

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What are W9's? (If Lease Purchase Grant)

  • The contractor shall provide the Division with a completed Federal Form W-9 upon submission of the contractor’s first invoice.

 

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What is a facilities maintenance plan?

  • A document that details a strategy for proactively maintaining facilities.

 

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Why is a maintenance plan necessary?

  • Proper facility maintenance is necessary to ensure care of large capital investments and providing clean, safe and adequate learning environments. For example:
    • Students and staff perform better in an environment that is orderly, clean, and safe. Poor air quality can negatively affect student alertness, and student and teacher attendance, which has a corresponding impact on student learning. With proper maintenance, classrooms will be well ventilated, efficiently lighted, and will actually help learning. Also, appropriate facilities maintenance extends the life span of older facilities and maximizes the useful life of newer facilities. As a result, a facilities maintenance plan contributes to both the instructional and financial health of an educational organization.
  • With inadequate maintenance warranties can be void;
  • Failure to maintain school facilities properly also discourages future investment in the public education system.

 

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Why should we update the facilities plan that we wrote five years ago?

  • Facilities plans, like buildings, don’t age well unless they are maintained on an ongoing basis. Maintenance strategies depend on the condition of facilities, which changes over time. If the condition of the buildings, grounds, and equipment have changed in the past five years (which they probably have), the facilities plan should be updated to clarify those steps that need to be taken to maintain these valuable assets.

 

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How do we start to develop a facilities maintenance plan?

  • Involve stakeholders in the planning process;
  • Identify needs (e.g., improving cleanliness and safety, correcting deficiencies, addressing deferred projects, increasing efficiency, decreasing utility bills);
  • Establish priorities and targets;
  • Collect and use supporting data to inform decision-making;
  • Share the plan to garner support from management and key stakeholders;
  • Allocate funds to pay for planned activities;
  • Train staff to implement planned activities;
  • Implement the plan;
  • Be patient while awaiting cost savings or other results;
  • Evaluate the plan thoroughly;
  • Improve efforts based on evaluation findings;
  • Review and revise the plan periodically (e.g., every three years).

 

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What are the benefits of using a maintenance plan?

  • Good facilities maintenance can save money by lowering replacement costs, labor costs, overhead and utility costs, operational cost, and life cycle costs;
  • It can improve the cleanliness, orderliness, and safety of a facility;
  • Identifies priorities proactively rather than reactively;
  • Extends the useful life of buildings;
  • Increase energy efficiency and helps the environment.

 

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What types of maintenance are there?

  • Emergency Maintenance: Needs fixed immediately;
  • Routine Maintenance: Address when time allows;
  • Preventive Maintenance: Identify the items and the services that are required for preventative maintenance (e.g., routine maintenance/inspections including fire/safety Inspections/warranties). Schedule this work as needed;
  • Predictive Maintenance: Using software applications or other alternatives, equipment failure can be predicted.

 

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How do we plan for preventative maintenance?

  • Schedule Maintenance and Inspections;
  • At the completion of maintenance projects or inspections, follow up with necessary documentation and file accordingly. In addition complete documentation of warranty work that is completed;
  • Establish expectations for custodial efforts;
  • Establish a Grounds Management Plan that maintains the full extent of the school property on a routine and preventative basis;
  • Develop a work order system that is compatible with the size of the school district:
    • How is a work order initiated;
    • How to close out a work order;
    • Is the work order system streamlined to minimize number of people involved;
    • Develop a means to purchase supplies and monitor supplies and purchases.
  • During the design process evaluate the selection of standardizing equipment/product etc. to save on storage costs and increased staff training for servicing multiple brands.

 

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What maintenance and operations issues should be addressed?

 

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How can a maintenance plan be evaluated?

  • Develop a baselines against which progress can be measured (e.g., average time it takes to complete a work order);
  • Use accurate and up-to-date data;
  • Use tools to provide the evaluation data (e.g., work orders, energy use, software applications, etc.).

 

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What facility maintenance guidelines and tools are there?

 

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Fax: 303-830-0793
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