2020 Colorado Academic Standards

2020 Colorado Academic Standards Online

Use the options below to create customized views of the 2020 Colorado Academic Standards. For all standards resources, see the Office of Standards and Instructional Support.

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clear Content Area: Social Studies // Grade Level: Sixth Grade // Standard Category: All Standards Categories

Social Studies

Sixth Grade, Standard 1. History

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Understand the nature of historical knowledge as a process of inquiry that examines and analyzes how history is viewed, constructed, and interpreted.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources to ask and research historical questions about the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Identify ways different cultures record history in the Western Hemisphere.
  2. Analyze multiple primary and secondary sources while formulating historical questions about the Western Hemisphere. For example: art, artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, artifacts, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams and written texts.
  3. Gather, organize, synthesize, and critique information to determine if it is sufficient to answer historical questions about the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make connections between information gathered and personal experiences to research historical questions. (Strategic Learning: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving)
  2. Engage in novel approaches, moves, directions, ideas, and/or perspectives while using inquiry and primary sources. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Creativity/Innovation)
  3. Examine various resources, to look for and find value in different perspectives expressed by others. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)
  4. Utilize primary and secondary sources to examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors. (Professional Skills: Information Literacy)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What questions help us understand the development of the Western Hemisphere and the interactions of people in the region?
  2. Why do sources on the same topic vary, and how do we determine which ones will help us effectively interpret the past?
  3. What key primary sources help us to understand the Western Hemisphere?
  4. How is the bias of the author of a source reflected in the source itself?

More information icon Nature and Skills of History:

  1. Historical thinkers evaluate historical sources for purpose, audience, point of view, context, reliability, and authenticity.
  2. Historical thinkers use primary and secondary sources to develop and evaluate hypotheses and interpretations of historical events and figures that are supported by evidence.
  3. Historical thinkers identify points of view, seek multiple sources, and develop and defend a thesis with evidence.
  4. Historical thinkers use technology to explore and evaluate for accuracy of information.
  5. Historical thinkers use context and content from the past is used to make connections to the present.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources
  2. Conduct research by locating, gathering, organizing information and data, and evaluating online and print resources.
  3. Evaluate information critically and competently.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 2. Analyze historical time periods and patterns of continuity and change, through multiple perspectives, within and among cultures and societies.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas, and themes within regions of the Western Hemisphere and their relationships with one another.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Explain how people, products, cultures, and ideas interact and are interconnected in the Western Hemisphere and how they have impacted modern times.
  2. Determine and explain the historical context of key people, events, and ideas over time including the examination of different perspectives from people involved. For example: Aztec, Maya, Inca, Inuit, early Native American cultures of North America, major explorers, colonizers of countries in the Western Hemisphere, and the Columbian Exchange.
  3. Identify examples of the social, political, cultural, and economic development in key areas of the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make connections between information gathered and personal experiences to research historical questions. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  2. Engage in novel approaches, moves, directions, ideas, and/or perspectives while using inquiry and primary sources. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Creativity/Innovation)
  3. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global challenges within the Western Hemisphere using multiple disciplinary perspectives such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  4. Examine various resources, to look for and find value in different perspectives expressed by others. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why have civilizations succeeded and failed?
  2. To what extent does globalization depend on a society's resistance to and adaptation to change over time?
  3. What factors influenced the development of civilizations and nations in the Western Hemisphere?

More information icon Nature and Skills of History:

  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes across time.
  2. Historical thinkers study the people, places, ideas, and events in the Western Hemisphere to construct the story of history from multiple perspectives.
  3. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  4. Historical thinkers examine, interpret, and evaluate data for point of view, historical context, or propaganda and use it to inform decisions on the current world today.
  5. Historical thinkers investigate how philosophies and ideas from the Aztec, Maya, Inca, and others in history continue to inform and affect the present.
  6. Historical thinkers research how technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
  2. Identify propaganda, censorship, and bias in the media.
  3. Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss consequences of inappropriate use.
  4. Cite textual evidence from content-specific texts to demonstrate understanding and support an analysis of the text, conduct an experiment, or perform a task.

Social Studies

Sixth Grade, Standard 2. Geography

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 3. Apply geographic representations and perspectives to analyze human movement, spatial patterns, systems, and the connections and relationships among them.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Use geographic tools and resources to research and make geographic inferences and predictions about the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Use geographic tools to identify, locate and describe places and regions in the Western Hemisphere, to solve problems. For example: latitude, longitude, scale on maps, globes, and other resources such as GPS and satellite imagery.
  2. Collect, analyze, and synthesize data from geographic tools to compare regions in the Western Hemisphere.
  3. Examine geographic sources to formulate questions and investigate responses.
  4. Interpret, apply, and communicate geographic data to justify potential solutions to problems in the Western Hemisphere at the local, state, national, and global levels.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Apply knowledge to set goals, make informed decisions and transfer to new contexts. (Personal Skills: Initiative/Self-Direction)
  2. Engage in novel approaches, directions, ideas, and/or perspectives while using inquiry and primary sources. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Creativity/Innovation)
  3. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global challenges, within the Western Hemisphere, which are appropriate to their contexts using multiple disciplinary perspectives, such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  4. Using geographic tools and resources, demonstrate task management attributes associated with producing high quality products including the abilities to: (a) Work positively and ethically; (b) Manage time and projects effectively; (c) Multi-task, and; (d) Clearly communicate with others. (Professional Skills: Task/Time Management).

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How can geographic tools be used to solve problems in the future?
  2. Why does where we live influence how we live?
  3. How do populations, physical features, resources, and perceptions of places and regions change over time?
  4. How have geographic factors influenced human settlement, economic activity, and land acquisition?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Geography:

  1. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to develop spatial thinking and awareness skills.
  2. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to help to solve problems in daily life. For example: a car GPS is used to find a location, maps are used by tourists, and directions are found on the internet.
  3. Geographic thinkers evaluate patterns that connect people in the Western Hemisphere to the rest of the world.
  4. Geographic thinkers explore how technology is used by individuals and businesses to answer geographic problems such as the spread of disease, migration patterns, and distribution and loss of resources like water supplies.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Integrate visual information such as charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps, with other information in print and digital texts.
  2. Explain and justify decisions and shared content through the use of online maps, graphs, charts, data and diagrams.
  3. Manage the flow of information from a wide variety of sources.
  4. Present arguments or information in a logical sequence with a clear claim, supportive evidence, and effective presence that builds credibility.
  5. Generate questions to guide research, gather information from print and digital sources, determine biases and credibility of sources, cite sources accurately, and use evidence to answer their research question

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 4. Examine the characteristics of places and regions, and the changing nature among geographic and human interactions.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Regional differences and perspectives in the Western Hemisphere impact human and environmental interactions.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Classify and analyze the types of human and geographic connections between places.
  2. Identify physical features of the Western Hemisphere and explain their effects on people who reside in the region.
  3. Analyze positive and negative interactions of human and physical systems in the Western Hemisphere and give examples of how people have adapted to their physical environment.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Look for and find value in different perspectives expressed by others in the Western Hemisphere. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)
  2. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global challenges within the Western Hemisphere which are appropriate to their contexts using multiple disciplinary perspectives such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  3. Apply knowledge to set goals, make informed decisions and transfer to new contexts. (Personal Skills: Initiative/Self-Direction)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are different ways to define the Western Hemisphere based on human and physical systems?
  2. How have people interacted with the environment over time in a positive or negative way?
  3. How has globalization affected people and places?
  4. In what ways are places on Earth interdependent?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Geography:

  1. Geographic thinkers examine places and regions and the connections among them.
  2. Geographic thinkers study how human and physical systems vary and interact to make better choices, decisions, and predictions. For example: resource distribution or trade is based on geographic features and environmental changes which affect business decisions.
  3. Geographic thinkers analyze data regarding physical and human systems to make informed choices regarding production, trade, and resource acquisition.
  4. Geographic thinkers use geographic information about human and physical systems to make decisions such as establishing trade routes, locating cities, trade centers and capitals, and establishing outposts and security systems like forts and walls.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text.
  2. Demonstrate positive social and ethical behaviors when using technology and discuss consequences of inappropriate use.
  3. Use information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand.
  4. Analyze different texts (including experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia texts) to compare and contrast competing theories, points of view, and arguments in the discipline.

Social Studies

Sixth Grade, Standard 3. Economics

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 5. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Investigate how societies create different economic systems in the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Describe how economic systems in the Western Hemisphere (such as traditional, command, market, and mixed) allocate resources.
  2. Use economic reasoning to explain how specialization of production can result in more interdependence. For example: international trade patterns.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global economic system challenges that are appropriate to their contexts using multiple disciplinary perspectives such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  2. Look for and find value in different economic perspectives expressed by others in the Western Hemisphere. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)
  3. Make connections between information gathered and personal experiences to research economic questions. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do different systems address the production of goods?
  2. How are scarce resources distributed in different types of economic systems?
  3. How do different economies control the means of production and distribution of goods and services?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Economic thinkers study how and why individuals make decisions about purchases and in different locations.
  2. Economic thinkers study the effects of different types of economies on global interdependence.
  3. Economic thinkers explore how economic development varies and can be compared across countries in the Western Hemisphere including levels of education and average income.
  4. Economic thinkers investigate how governments and the private sector cooperate to distribute goods and services, specialize, and are interdependent in the global economy.
  5. Economic thinkers explain how career opportunities are influenced by the type of economic system.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  2. Read to identify cause-and-effect relationships, compare and contrast information, fact vs. opinion, and author bias.
  3. Use content-specific technology tools to support learning and research.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 6. Apply economic reasoning skills to make informed personal financial decisions (PFL).

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Investigate the role of consumers within the Western Hemisphere (PFL).

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Explain the roles of buyers and sellers in product, labor, and financial markets.
  2. Describe the role of competition in the determination of prices and wages in a market economy.
  3. Explore how consumer spending decisions and demand impact market economies.
  4. Analyze how external factors might influence spending decisions for different individuals.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of cause and effect related to personal financial decisions. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Character)
  2. Identify and explain multiple perspectives (cultural and global) when exploring economic events, ideas, and issues within the Western Hemisphere. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  3. Assess personal strengths and limitations with a well-grounded sense of confidence, optimism, and a growth mindset. (Personal Skills: Self-Awareness).

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How did different societies in the Western Hemisphere define the roles of buyers and sellers in the various markets?
  2. What role did the distribution of resources play in personal financial decisions?
  3. What role has competition and wages played in different cultures?
  4. Why is it important to analyze the various levels of a culture before understanding how individuals in that culture would make financial decisions?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Financially capable individuals determine how history, location, and the distribution of resources have impacted financial decisions.
  2. Financially capable individuals understand that competition and wages are not just American concepts. These concepts have applied to individual financial decisions long before the birth of the nation.
  3. Financially capable individuals understand that populations within various cultures have made individual financial decisions differently throughout time and location.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop.
  2. Explain how a question represents key ideas in the field.
  3. Explain points of agreement experts have about interpretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a compelling question
  4. Integrate multimedia as effective tools for presenting and clarifying information.

Social Studies

Sixth Grade, Standard 4. Civics

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 7. Express an understanding of how civic participation affects policy by applying the rights and responsibilities of a citizen.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Analyze the relationships of different nations in the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of living in an interconnected world.
  2. Examine changes and connections in ideas about citizenship in different times and places in the Western Hemisphere.
  3. Describe how groups and individuals influence governments within the Western Hemisphere.
  4. Explain how political ideas and significant people have interacted, are interconnected, and have influenced nations.
  5. Analyze political issues from national and global perspectives over time.
  6. Identify historical examples illustrating how people from diverse backgrounds in the Western Hemisphere perceived and reacted to various global issues.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Examine how individuals in the Western Hemisphere interpret messages differently, how values and points of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors. (Professional Skills: Information Literacy)
  2. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global challenges, in the Western Hemisphere, which are appropriate to their contexts, using multiple disciplinary perspectives such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness).
  3. Look for and find value in different perspectives expressed by others in the Western Hemisphere. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility).

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What does it mean to live in an interconnected world?
  2. How can you be a productive member of the global community and a contributing citizen of the United States?
  3. Why are there greater challenges and opportunities when multiple groups interact?
  4. Why do national and global viewpoints sometimes differ?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Civics:

  1. Civic-minded individuals discuss and analyze how various government decisions impact people, places, and history.
  2. Civic-minded individuals analyze how the actions of individuals and groups can have a local, national, and international impact.
  3. Civic-minded individuals analyze the relationship between rights and responsibility in national and global contexts.
  4. Civic-minded individuals explain how nations are interconnected and affect each other on a daily basis. For example: businesses are affected by the laws, regulations, nations; and markets are damaged by drought, earthquakes and other natural disasters throughout the world.
  5. Civic-minded individuals demonstrate how technology provides daily information regarding the interaction between the United States government and other nations.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, and causally).
  2. Communicate and present information orally, in writing, and through the development of multimedia presentations, and other forms of technology in an effective manner.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 8. Analyze the origins, structures, and functions of governments to evaluate the impact on citizens and the global society.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Systems of government in the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Describe different systems of government in the Western Hemisphere.
  2. Identify how different systems of government relate to their citizens in the Western Hemisphere.
  3. Compare the economic components of the different systems of government in the Western Hemisphere.
  4. Compare the various governments and citizens' liberties in the Western Hemisphere.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors. (Professional Skills: Information Literacy)
  2. Plan and evaluate complex solutions to global challenges, in the Western Hemisphere, which are appropriate to their contexts, using multiple disciplinary perspectives such as cultural, historical, and scientific. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  3. Look for and find value in different perspectives expressed by others in the Western Hemisphere. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)
  4. Apply ethical perspectives/concepts to an ethical question/situation/scenario. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Character)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do you define good government?
  2. What evidence can you find of effective and ineffective governments in the past and the present?
  3. What would a government look like if you created it?
  4. What are the consequences if a government does not provide for the common good?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Civics:

  1. Civic-minded individuals discuss and evaluate how personal and national actions have global consequences.
  2. Civic-minded individuals identify ways in which lives are enriched and challenged because of the interconnected nature of a global society.
  3. Civic-minded individuals demonstrate how different forms of government affect daily life. For example: employees work in international corporations and tourists visit countries with different laws, rules, and regulations.
  4. Civic-minded individuals share how civic education is essential for understanding the implications of events around the world.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Identify key steps in a text's description of a process related to history/social studies.
  2. Evaluate the accuracy, relevance, appropriateness, and bias of online and print sources.
  3. Synthesize information from multiple sources to demonstrate understanding of a topic.

Need Help? Submit questions or requests for assistance to cobb_f@cde.state.co.us