2020 Colorado Academic Standards

2020 Colorado Academic Standards Online

Use the options below to create customized views of the 2020 Colorado Academic Standards. For all standards resources, see the Office of Standards and Instructional Support.

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clear Content Area: Social Studies // Grade Level: High School // Standard Category: All Standards Categories

Social Studies

High School, Standard 1. History

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Understand the nature of historical knowledge as a process of inquiry that examines and analyzes how history is viewed, constructed, and interpreted.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Use the historical method of inquiry to formulate compelling questions, evaluate primary and secondary sources, analyze and interpret data, and argue for an interpretation defended by textual evidence.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Formulate compelling and supporting questions after evaluating primary sources for point of view and historical context.
  2. Gather and analyze historical information to address questions from a range of primary and secondary sources containing a variety of perspectives.
  3. Gather and analyze historical information from a range of qualitative and quantitative sources. For example: demographic, economic, social, and political data.
  4. Construct and defend a historical argument that evaluates interpretations by analyzing, critiquing, and synthesizing evidence from the full range of relevant historical sources.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written, and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts, including multilingual. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Communication)
  2. Interpret, analyze, and draw conclusions using historical sources. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  3. Synthesize ideas in original and innovative ways. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Creativity/Innovation)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the point of view of a historian affect how history is interpreted?
  2. Do historians come to agreement on the historical significance of events? If so, how?
  3. What if the history of a war was told by someone other than the winners?
  4. Why are historical questions important?
  5. How do historical thinkers use primary and secondary sources to formulate historical arguments?
  6. How might historical inquiry be used to make decisions on contemporary issues?

More information icon Nature and Skills of History:

  1. Historical thinkers use questions generated about multiple historical sources to pursue further inquiry and investigate additional sources.
  2. Historical thinkers evaluate historical sources for audience, purpose, point of view, context, and authenticity.
  3. Historical thinkers use primary and secondary sources to evaluate and develop hypotheses and diverse interpretations of historical events and figures and patterns and trends.
  4. Historical thinkers evaluate the credibility of a source by examining how experts value the source.
  5. Historical thinkers use information and context to interpret, evaluate, and inform decisions or policies regarding such issues which societies find contentious or worthy of debate and discussion.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of a text as a whole.
  2. Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  3. Analyze in detail how a complex primary and/or secondary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
  4. Evaluate historians' differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.
  5. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  6. Individually and with others, students construct compelling questions, and explain points of agreement and disagreement about interpretations and applications of disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a compelling question.
  7. Explain how compelling questions contribute to an inquiry and how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.
  8. Interpret, analyze, and detect bias in historical sources.
  9. Write content-specific arguments in which they state a claim, provide evidence from texts and sources to support the claim, and organize the evidence in well-reasoned, meaningful ways.
  10. Integrate multimedia as effective tools for presenting and clarifying information.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 2. Analyze historical time periods and patterns of continuity and change, through multiple perspectives, within and among cultures and societies.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, complexity, unity and diversity, and significant ideas in the United States from Reconstruction to the present.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Analyze continuity and change in eras over the course of United States history.
  2. Investigate causes and effects of significant events throughout United States history. For example: world and regional conflicts, urbanization and suburbanization, economic cycles, and popular and countercultures.
  3. Analyze the complexity of events throughout United States history. For example: the civil rights movement, migration, immigration and displacement, mass media, landmark Supreme Court cases, and the war on terror.
  4. Examine and evaluate issues of unity and diversity from Reconstruction to present. For example: the systemic impact of racism and nativism, role of patriotism, expansion of rights, and the role of religion.
  5. Investigate the historical development and impact of major scientific and technological innovations in the Industrial Age, the Space Age, and the Digital Age. For example: Ford's assembly line, NASA, personal computing.
  6. Evaluate the historical development and impact of political thought, theory and actions. For example: the development of political parties, suffrage, reform, activist groups, and social movements.
  7. Analyze the origins of fundamental political debates and how opposing perspectives, compromise, and cooperation have shaped national unity and diversity. For example: suffrage, human and civil rights, and the role of government.
  8. Analyze ideas critical to the understanding of American history. For example: populism, progressivism, isolationism, imperialism, anti-communism, environmentalism, liberalism, fundamentalism, and conservatism.
  9. Describe and analyze the historical development and impact of the arts and literature on the culture of the United States. For example: the writings of the Muckrakers, political cartoons, the Harlem Renaissance, and protest songs and poems.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions and design data/information collection and analysis strategies to test historical hypotheses. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)
  2. Apply knowledge and skills to implement sophisticated, appropriate, and workable solutions to address complex national problems using interdisciplinary perspectives independently or with others. (Civics/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does society decide what is important in United States history?
  2. What ideas have united the American people over time?
  3. How does diversity affect the concept of change over time? Is change over time a matter of perspective?
  4. What if the belief “all men are created equal” had not been written in the United States Declaration of Independence?

More information icon Nature and Skills of History:

  1. Historical thinkers understand that the ability to negotiate the complex relationships among change, diversity, and unity throughout United States history, is an essential attribute for success in a more interconnected world.
  2. Historical thinkers understand that the ability to negotiate the complex interrelationship among political, social, and cultural institutions throughout United States history, is essential to participation in the economic life of a free society and our civic institutions.
  3. Historical thinkers analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of changing societies, promoting the common good, and protecting rights.
  4. Historical thinkers analyze how historical events and spatial diffusion of ideas, technology, and cultural practices have influenced migration patterns and the distribution of human population.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
  2. Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
  3. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
  4. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  5. Evaluate how historical events and developments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.
  6. Use questions generated about individuals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.
  7. Collaborate with peers, experts, and others using contemporary media to contribute to a content related knowledge base to compile, synthesize, produce, and disseminate information.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 2. Analyze historical time periods and patterns of continuity and change, through multiple perspectives, within and among cultures and societies.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

3. Key concepts of continuity and change, cause and effect, complexity, unity and diversity, and significant ideas throughout the world from the Renaissance to the present.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Evaluate continuity and change over the course of world history. For example: social and political movements related to nationality, ethnicity, and gender; revolutions; the World Wars, the Holocaust, the Cold War; and independence movements/decolonization.
  2. Investigate causes and effects of significant events throughout world history. For example: the Renaissance; the Protestant Reformation; the Industrial Revolution; the French, Russian, and Chinese Revolutions; the World Wars; genocides; and the Arab Spring movement.
  3. Analyze the complexity of events throughout world history. For example: religious rifts such as the Protestant Reformation and the Shiite/Sunni split in Islam; independence movements in Africa, the Americas, and Asia; and globalization and the rise of modern terrorist organizations.
  4. Examine and evaluate issues of unity and diversity throughout world history. For example: migration and immigration, nationalist movements, revolutions, colonialism, world conferences/international agreements, human rights issues, and the resulting changes in political geography.
  5. Discuss the historical development and contemporary impact of philosophical movements and major world religions. For example: the Enlightenment, the development and expansion of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, and Taoism.
  6. Investigate the historical development and impact of major scientific and technological innovations in the Industrial Age, the Space Age, and the Digital Age. For example: the British factory system, Sputnik, and the miniaturization of technology.
  7. Describe and analyze the historical development and impact of the arts and literature on the cultures of the world. For example: the Renaissance, Modernism, propaganda, and the use of art and literature as forms of resistance.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions and design data/information collection and analysis strategies to test historical hypotheses. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)
  2. Apply knowledge and skills to implement sophisticated, appropriate, and workable solutions to address complex global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives independently or with others. (Civic Interpersonal: Global/Cultural Awareness)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How have different cultures influenced world history?
  2. How do historians work from/with cultural assumptions to decide what is important in world history?
  3. What ideas transcend cultural, political, economic, and social differences in world history?
  4. How does cultural, political, economic and social diversity affect perceptions of change over time?
  5. How are human rights respected and defended in a world of different nations and cultures?

More information icon Nature and Skills of History:

  1. Historical thinkers understand that the ability to negotiate the complex relationships among change, diversity, and unity throughout world history is an essential attribute for success in a more interconnected world.
  2. Historical thinkers understand that the ability to analyze the significance of interactions among eras, ideas, individuals, and groups is an essential skill in an increasingly globalizing world.
  3. Historical thinkers analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of changing societies, promoting the common good, and protecting rights.
  4. Historical thinkers analyze how historical events and spatial diffusion of ideas, technology, and cultural practices have influenced migration patterns and the distribution of human population.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
  2. Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.
  3. Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes.
  4. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  5. Evaluate how historical events and developments were shaped by unique circumstances of time and place as well as broader historical contexts.
  6. Use questions generated about individuals and groups to assess how the significance of their actions changes over time and is shaped by the historical context.
  7. Collaborate with peers, experts, and others using contemporary media to contribute to a content related knowledge base to compile, synthesize, produce, and disseminate information.

Social Studies

High School, Standard 2. Geography

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 3. Apply geographic representations and perspectives to analyze human movement, spatial patterns, systems, and the connections and relationships among them.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Use geographic tools and resources to analyze Earth’s human systems and physical features to investigate and address geographic issues.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Analyze variations in spatial patterns of cultural and environmental characteristics at multiple scales while gathering geographic data from a variety of sources. For example: maps, GIS, graphs, charts.
  2. Create and interpret maps to display and explain the spatial patterns of cultural and environmental characteristics using geospatial and related technologies.
  3. Evaluate relationships between the locations of places and regions and their political, cultural, and economic relationships using maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Interpret geographic information and draw conclusions based on the geo-spatial reasoning. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  2. Apply results of analysis to make a tangible and useful contribution to the community. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Informed Risk Taking)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the significance of spatial orientation, place, and location?
  2. How have the tools of a geographer changed over time?
  3. What can various types of data tell us about a place?
  4. How can you support an argument with geographic evidence?
  5. Why is “where” important?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Geography:

  1. Geographic reasoning brings societies and nature under the lens of spatial analysis, and aids in personal and societal decision making and problem solving.
  2. Spatial thinkers gather, display, and analyze geographic information using geographic tools.
  3. Spatial thinkers use absolute and relative location, mental maps, and spatial orientation in studying geographic questions.
  4. Spatial thinkers predict how human activities will help shape Earth’s surface and ways that people might cooperate and compete for use of Earth’s resources.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats.
  2. Determine what text states; make inferences; cite specific textual evidence.
  3. Formulate appropriate research questions.
  4. Conduct research by gathering, organizing, and evaluating the credibility and bias of information from a variety of online, print, and non-print sources.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 4. Examine the characteristics of places and regions, and the changing nature among geographic and human interactions.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Geographic variables influence interactions of people, places, and environments.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Identify, evaluate, and communicate strategies to respond to constraints placed on human systems by the physical environment.
  2. Analyze interpret, and predict the influences of migration and the distribution of human population based on reciprocal patterns. For example: historical events, the spatial diffusion of ideas, technologies, and cultural practices.
  3. Analyze patterns of distribution and arrangements of settlements and the processes of the diffusion of human activities. For example: urban/rural, regional, and transportation patterns.
  4. Explain how altering the environment has brought prosperity to some places and created environmental dilemmas for others.
  5. Research and interpret multiple viewpoints on issues that shape policies and programs for resource use and sustainability. For example: immigration, resource distribution, and universal human rights.
  6. Evaluate the influence of long-term climate variability on human migration and settlement patterns, resource use, and land uses at local-to-global scales.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Apply geographic knowledge and skills to implement sophisticated, appropriate, and workable ideas to address complex geographic interactions using interdisciplinary perspectives independently or with others. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  2. Interpret geographic variables and draw conclusions based on geo-spatial analysis. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  3. Design data/information collection and analysis strategies to facilitate geographic inquiry. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How might the physical geography of Earth change in the future?
  2. How might people and societies respond to changes in the physical environment?
  3. What are the maximum limits of human activity the environment can withstand without deterioration?
  4. Why might people choose to move or stay in the original location?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Geography:

  1. Spatial thinkers study how the physical environment is modified by human activities, including how human societies value and use natural resources.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate major areas of environmental and societal interaction.
  3. Geographic thinkers understand that individual actions affect the local environment and global community such as the impact of recycling and consumption of resources.
  4. Geographic thinkers understand how technology can support invention and influence how humans modify the environment in both positive and negative ways. For example, the renovation of existing buildings to “green” technologies, the prevention and prediction of natural hazards and disasters, and the use of satellite imagery to track water availability in the Middle East.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats.
  2. Determine what text states; make inferences; cite specific textual evidence.
  3. Read for specific purpose. For example: detect cause-and-effect relationships, compare and contrast information, identify fact vs. opinion, and author bias.
  4. Process and effectively communicate and present information orally, in writing, and through development of websites, multimedia presentations, and other forms of technology.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 4. Examine the characteristics of places and regions, and the changing nature among geographic and human interactions.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

3. The interconnected nature of the world, its people and places.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Explain how the uneven distribution of resources in the world can lead to conflict, competition, or cooperation among nations, regions, and cultural groups.
  2. Explain that the world's population is increasingly connected to and dependent upon other people for both human and natural resources.
  3. Explain how migration of people and movement of goods and ideas can enrich cultures, but also create tensions.
  4. Analyze how cooperation and conflict influence the division and control of Earth. For example: international agreements, political patterns, and national boundaries.
  5. Make predictions and draw conclusions about the global impact of cultural diffusion/assimilation. For example: human rights, language, religion, and ethnicity.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills to implement sophisticated, appropriate, and workable solutions to address complex global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives independently or with others. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  2. Apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues in the interconnected nature of the world for effective civic participation. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Civic Engagement & Character)
  3. Interpret geographic information and draw conclusions based on geo-spatial analysis. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does globalization influence the interactions of people on Earth?
  2. How do cooperation and conflict influence the division and control of the social, economic, and political spaces on Earth?
  3. What does it mean to support human rights?
  4. What predictions can be made about human migration patterns?
  5. How do technologies result in social change? For example: social networking and the speed of modern "movements"?
  6. What is your role in the world?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Geography:

  1. Spatial thinkers evaluate global systems such as culture, diffusion, interdependence, migration, population pyramids, regional alliances, development of competition and trade, and the impact of population changes on society.
  2. Spatial thinkers study the interconnection between physical processes and human activities that help shape the Earth’s surface.
  3. Spatial thinkers analyze how people’s lives and identities are rooted in time and place.
  4. Spatial thinkers understand that the world is geographically interconnected, affecting daily life in such ways as the spread of disease, global impact of modern technology, and the impact of cultural diffusion.
  5. Geographic thinkers understand that the responsible use of technology creates new life choices, new interconnections between people, new opportunities, and unintended consequences.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats.
  2. Determine what text states; make inferences; cite specific textual evidence.
  3. Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information.
  4. Synthesize information from a range of sources such as texts, experiments, and simulations into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

Social Studies

High School, Standard 3. Economics

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 5. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Productive resources (natural, human, capital) are scarce; therefore, choices are made about how individuals, businesses, governments, and nonprofits allocate these resources.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Explain the economic way of thinking: the condition of scarcity requires choice and choice has a cost (opportunity cost).
  2. Analyze how positive and negative incentives influence the choices made by individuals, households, businesses, government and nonprofits.
  3. Explain how effective decision-making requires comparing the additional (marginal) costs of alternatives with the additional (marginal) benefits.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills to analyze how individuals, businesses, governments, and nonprofits deal with the challenges of scarcity. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  2. Identify the incentives that influence individuals, businesses, government, and nonprofits and draw conclusions based on cost-benefit analysis. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does the condition of scarcity affect our decision-making, whether individually or collectively?
  2. How might policy makers incentivize responsible personal financial behavior among its citizens?
  3. How might policy makers incentivize potential entrepreneurs to address issues of scarcity through innovation and creativity?
  4. How is marginal thinking used to make decisions?
  5. How are incentives influenced by values? For example: ethics, religious beliefs, cultural values.

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Economic thinkers realize that, due to scarcity, we must make choices which involve the prioritization of alternatives.
  2. Economic thinkers assume that every choice, whether by governments, businesses, nonprofits or individuals, has an opportunity cost.
  3. Economic thinkers understand that, using the economic way of thinking, individuals analyze how the benefit of using productive resources for a particular purpose compares with the opportunity cost of this resource use.
  4. Economic thinkers apply the economic way of thinking we assume that people make particular choices because they are responding to the underlying incentives.
  5. Economic thinkers realize that the proper analysis to use in decision-making is the marginal benefit and the marginal cost.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Read for a specific purpose (i.e., detect cause-and- effect relationships, compare and contrast information, identify fact vs. opinion, and author bias).
  2. Process or synthesize information through writing using note taking, graphic organizers, summaries, proper sequencing of events, and/or formatting thesis statements that examine why as well as how.
  3. Create, interpret, and analyze graphs, charts, and diagrams.
  4. Process and effectively communicate and present information orally, in writing, and through development of websites, multimedia presentations and other forms of technology.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 5. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Economic systems, market structures, competition, and government policies affect market outcomes.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Compare and contrast economic systems in terms of their ability to achieve economic goals. For example: command, socialism, communism, and market capitalism.
  2. Use supply and demand analysis to explain how competitive markets efficiently allocate scarce resources.
  3. Scrutinize what happens in markets when governments impose price controls (price ceiling and price floors).
  4. Compare and contrast the market outcomes created by various market structures that are not purely competitive: monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly.
  5. Explore the role of government in addressing market failures. For example: monopoly power/antitrust legislation, public goods, negative/positive externalities, the environment, property rights, regulation, and income distribution.
  6. Compare and contrast different types of taxing. For example: progressive, regressive, proportional, and marginal versus average tax rates.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Manipulate and interpret the tools of supply and demand. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)
  2. Demonstrate ways different economic systems can answer the basic economic questions of what, how, and for whom to produce goods and services. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)
  3. Interpret information and draw conclusions about markets based on the supply and demand analysis. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How do various economic systems make decisions regarding the production and distribution of goods and services?
  2. What functions do prices serve in a market economy?
  3. What are some costs and benefits of embracing a system of supply and demand as a basic allocation mechanism for society?
  4. How does competition affect the choices consumers have in an economy?
  5. What criteria might you use in creating a tax system?
  6. What are the pros and cons of various tax systems?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Economic thinkers compare economic systems by analyzing how each addresses the broad economic goals of the society.
  2. Economic thinkers use supply and demand analysis to understand how resources are allocated and prices are determined.
  3. Economic thinkers analyze the effects of government interference in the market through application of the demand and supply model.
  4. Economic thinkers analyze the impact that "imperfectly competitive" markets have on consumers.
  5. Economic thinkers investigate the underlying cause of market failures and how to best use government policy to correct the failures.
  6. Economic thinkers recognize the importance of evaluating tax structures by examining how taxes paid change with the tax base.
  7. Economic thinkers understand that the average tax rate captures the burden of a tax, but that behavior is more likely to be impacted by changes in the marginal tax rate.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  2. Process and effectively communicate and present information orally, in writing, and through development of websites, multimedia presentations and other forms of technology.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 5. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

3. The business cycle affects the macroeconomy, and government policies can be used in an attempt to stabilize the economy.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Describe how Gross Domestic Product (GDP) provides a measure of the aggregate output of the economy.
  2. Explain how inflation and unemployment vary with the business cycle.
  3. Describe how fiscal policy (tax and government spending, which is controlled by Congress and the President) can be used to stabilize the economy.
  4. Describe how monetary policy can be used by the Federal Reserve to stabilize the economy.
  5. Examine the sources of economic growth and the importance of improvements in productivity (output per hour of work).

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions about the future course of the economy by interpreting economic data. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  2. Design economic interventions to address economic challenges. (Personal Skills: Adaptability/Flexibility)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. In what ways is the US standard of living different from past generations?
  2. What considerations should be taken into account when deciding to reduce the rate of inflation in an economy?
  3. How might economics and politics intermingle when policymakers attempt to stabilize an economy?
  4. How desirable are economic growth and improvements in productivity for a society?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Economic thinkers recognize the value and the limitations of GDP as a measure of economic well-being.
  2. Economic thinkers understand how inflation and unemployment are calculated and used, and recognize the potential imperfections of these measures.
  3. Economic thinkers study when and how to apply fiscal and/or monetary policy to stabilize the macroeconomy.
  4. Economic thinkers gather and analyze data to explore trends and predictions of the macroeconomy.
  5. Economic thinkers study the relationship between fiscal and monetary policies and the impact on the economy.
  6. Economic thinkers track productivity trends to better understand the underlying path of economic growth.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Process or synthesize information through writing using note taking, graphic organizers, summaries, proper sequencing of events, and/or formulating thesis statements that examine why as well as how.
  2. Develop questions and plan inquiries.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 5. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

4. Globalization and international trade affect the allocation of goods, services, and resources.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Analyze the role of comparative advantage in international trade of goods and services.
  2. Describe worldwide import/export patterns.
  3. Recognize how exchange rates affect economic activity.
  4. Explain how trade policies affect international trade and domestic markets. For example: free trade, tariffs, quotas, and subsidies.
  5. Explore the effects of current globalization trends and policies. For example: economic growth, labor markets, the rights of citizens, and the environment in different nations.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Apply knowledge and skills to analyze trade policy and its global complexities. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)
  2. Make predictions about the effects of different trade policies. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. Why do people trade?
  2. How important is international trade to the economies of various countries around the world?
  3. What are some costs and benefits of globalization and international trade for various parties?
  4. What opportunities might attract entrepreneurs into the international trade arena?
  5. How defensible are the criticisms of free trade?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Economic thinkers recognize the importance of the theory of comparative advantage in determining the pattern of trade between countries.
  2. Economic thinkers use the tool of demand and supply to better understand movements in exchange rates.
  3. Economic thinkers recognize that fiscal and monetary policies affect people through various channels to include the impact on financial markets, the impact on exchange rates and the cost of travel, and the effect of interest rates on the cost of borrowing money.
  4. Economic thinkers study why tariffs, quotas and other trade policies are enacted by examining the winners and losers from such protectionism.
  5. Economic thinkers use an economic way of thinking to study factors that lead to increased economic interdependence, increased productivity, and an improved standard of living for individuals in a society.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Create, interpret, analyze and detect bias in maps, graphs, charts, diagrams.
  2. Process or synthesize information through writing using note taking, graphic organizers, summaries, proper sequencing of events, and/or formulating thesis statements that examine why as well as how.
  3. Formulate appropriate research questions.
  4. Conduct research by gathering, organizing, and evaluating the credibility and bias of information from a variety of online, print, and non-print sources.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 6. Apply economic reasoning skills to make informed personal financial decisions (PFL).

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

5. Determine factors that impact an individual’s earning capability (PFL).

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Predict the potential impact of education and skill development choices on future earning capability and financial well-being.
  2. Analyze the impact of economic conditions and cost of living factors on income and purchasing power.
  3. Calculate a sustainable household income based on financial obligations for different lifestyle scenarios.
  4. Analyze the monetary and non-monetary value of employee benefits in addition to pay. For example: employer-matched retirement fund contributions, paid time off, insurance, professional development, personal sense of accomplishment, sense of community.
  5. Describe factors that impact take-home pay and personal income tax liability.
  6. Develop income earning potential with intentional choices. For example: post-secondary education and professional development.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions and design data/information collection and analysis strategies. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis).
  2. Set personal goals and take responsibility for those goals through reflection upon prior outcomes. (Professional Skills: Task/Time Management).
  3. Demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and personal awareness of how their dreams and interests translate into career fulfillment and career pathways available in local, regional, national and global arenas. (Professional Skills: Career Awareness).

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the role of education and earning capability in building financial security?
  2. What potential barriers might impede an individual’s work routine, hinder the ability to get a job, or prevent career advancement, and how can an individual overcome the barriers?
  3. How much money is enough for financial security? How much money is enough for retirement?
  4. What is the return on investment of post-secondary educational opportunities?
  5. How do employment decisions and career planning fit into an individual’s comprehensive financial plan?
  6. What resources are available to individuals seeking help with career, employment and training?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Financially capable individuals consider the value of professional development, income earning potential, value of workplace benefits, and labor market trends as part of a lifetime comprehensive financial plan.
  2. Financially capable individuals plan for income tax liability.
  3. Financially capable individuals consider opportunity costs when making decisions about professional development and career changes.
  4. Financially capable individuals analyze economic cycles and make predictions regarding economic trends.
  5. Financially capable individuals calculate the sustainable household income given specific market conditions and lifestyle circumstances which provides consumers with income earning goals when deciding employment, career path, and professional development.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Analyze how incentives influence choices that may result in policies with a range of costs and benefits for different groups.
  2. Describe the consequences of competition in specific markets.
  3. Use economic indicators to analyze the current and future state of the economy.
  4. Explain how current globalization trends and policies affect economic growth, labor markets, rights of citizens, the environment, and resource and income distribution in different nations.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 6. Apply economic reasoning skills to make informed personal financial decisions (PFL).

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

6. Establish personal investment objectives (PFL).

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Select financial investments that align with financial goals, risk tolerance, and personal values at different life stages.
  2. Explore long-range comprehensive financial planning strategies. For example: diversification, automation, and monitoring.
  3. Determine how financial investments impact income tax obligations.
  4. Analyze how financial markets react to changes in market conditions, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and information. For example: the business cycle.
  5. Explain the role of government related to investing regulation, and consumer protection.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions and design data/information collection and analysis strategies. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)
  2. Set personal goals and take responsibility for those goals through reflection upon prior outcomes. (Professional Skills: Task/Time Management)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a consumer choose between investment options?
  2. How might changes in the economic cycle and market conditions affect future earnings on an individual's investments?
  3. What are some ways that individuals might rate the security, accuracy, and relevancy of financial information?
  4. How does investing fit into an individual’s comprehensive financial plan?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Financially capable individuals consider the value that investing plays as part of a lifetime comprehensive financial plan.
  2. Financially capable individuals carefully consider the amount of financial risk that they can tolerate based on life stage, and they plan for changes in the economic cycles.
  3. Financially capable individuals create plans based on sound economic principles to maximize their standard of living over time.
  4. Financially capable individuals analyze market conditions and make predictions regarding economic trends.
  5. Financially capable individuals know how to perform time value of money calculations allowing investigation of rate of return, future value of investments, and present value of long-term financial goals.
  6. Financially capable individuals understand the relationship between variables in a function which allows people to use functions to model relationships in the real world such as the impact of compound interest.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of the sources.
  2. Use economic indicators to analyze the current and future state of the economy.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 6. Apply economic reasoning skills to make informed personal financial decisions (PFL).

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

7. Apply consumer skills to spending, saving, and borrowing decisions (PFL).

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Analyze how inflation and cost of living impact consumer purchasing and saving power.
  2. Summarize factors to consider when selecting borrowing options, including costs, relevance, payoffs and tradeoffs. For example: comparing student loan options, auto loan options, and payday lending options.
  3. Analyze consumer and financial information for relevance, credibility, and accuracy.
  4. Investigate consumer responsibilities, rights, and protections when entering into contracts and engaging in commerce. For example: discrimination laws, credit reporting laws, loan contracts, and online purchases.
  5. Explain how an individual’s credit history can affect borrowing power.
  6. Design a spending plan/budget that covers financial obligations and integrates saving for future goals.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Make predictions and design data/information collection and analysis strategies. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Inquiry/Analysis)
  2. Take responsibility for spending decisions and borrowing decisions. (Personal Skills: Initiative/Self-Direction).
  3. Set personal goals and take responsibility for those goals through reflection upon prior outcomes. (Professional Skills: Task/Time Management).

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How does a consumer determine the accuracy and relevancy of consumer information?
  2. How might changes in the economic cycle and market conditions affect a household spending plan?
  3. How might changes in lifestyle, income, or life circumstances affect a household spending plan?
  4. When might it make sense to take on debt? When does it not make sense?
  5. How much will today’s purchase cost tomorrow?
  6. What resources are available to individuals seeking help with financial hardships?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Financially capable individuals demonstrate effective decision-making by comparing the additional costs of alternatives with the additional benefits.
  2. Financially capable individuals plan and monitor spending and saving to fulfill financial obligations and achieve goals as part of a comprehensive financial plan.
  3. Financially capable individuals know their rights and obligations when using credit.
  4. Financially capable individuals understand that there is an economic role for government in a market economy whenever the benefits of a government policy outweigh its costs.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, and assess the credibility and accuracy of the sources.
  2. Describe the consequences of competition in specific markets.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 6. Apply economic reasoning skills to make informed personal financial decisions (PFL).

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

8. Choose risk management strategies for protection from the financial risk of lost income, lost or damaged property, health issues, or identity fraud (PFL).

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Evaluate strategies for consumers to avoid financial risk, reduce risk, accept risk, or transfer risk to others through insurance.
  2. Explain the purpose of insurance and how insurance works. For example property insurance, health insurance, and disability insurance.
  3. Analyze the cost of insurance as a method to offset the financial risk of a situation.
  4. Examine types of individual and external factors that impact insurance costs for individuals. For example, insured profile, number and size of claims, frequency and costs of natural disasters.
  5. Outline steps to monitor and safeguard personal financial data and resolve identity theft or fraud issues.
  6. Explain the role of government related to insurance regulation, fraud protection, and disaster response.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Interpret information and draw conclusions based on the best analysis. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  2. Develop, plan, and organize self-behavior. (Personal Skills: Personal Responsibility)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. How are individuals, groups of consumers, and markets impacted by unexpected financial obligations due to property loss or damage, loss of income, health care issues, and fraud?
  2. What should a consumer consider when choosing insurance for particular situations?
  3. How will your insurance needs change during your lifetime?
  4. How does probability relate to obtaining insurance and the cost of insurance?
  5. How can consumers decrease insurance costs?
  6. How does insurance fit into an individual’s comprehensive financial plan?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Economics:

  1. Financially capable individuals mitigate the financial risks associated with everyday life through planning for the unexpected, saving for emergencies, and acquiring insurance.
  2. Financially capable individuals consider insurance as a part of a lifetime comprehensive financial plan.
  3. Financially capable individuals demonstrate effective financial decision-making by comparing the additional costs of alternatives with the additional benefits.
  4. Financially capable individuals understand that probability allows informed decision-making, such as whether the cost of insurance is less than the expected cost of illness, when the deductible on car insurance is optimal, or whether an extended warranty justifies the cost.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Read and comprehend complex informational texts (e.g., insurance policies).
  2. Analyze how incentives influence choices that may result in policies with a range of costs and benefits for different groups.

Social Studies

High School, Standard 4. Civics

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 7. Express an understanding of how civic participation affects policy by applying the rights and responsibilities of a citizen.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Research and formulate positions on local, state, and national issues or policies to participate in a civil society.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Engage in civil discourse, including discussing current issues, advocating for individual or group rights, civic duty, and civic participation.
  2. Evaluate how individuals and groups can effectively use the structure and functions of various levels of government to shape policy.
  3. Explain the roles and influence of individuals, groups, and the press as checks on governmental practices. For example: direct contact with elected officials, participation in civic organizations, use of social media, and attendance at local governance meetings.
  4. Identify which level of government is appropriate for various policies and demonstrate an ability to appropriately engage individually and/or in groups with that level of government.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Participate in civil society at any of the levels of government, local, state, tribal, national, or international. (Civic Interpersonal Skills: Civic Engagement).
  2. Use interpersonal skills to learn and work with individuals and groups from diverse backgrounds in order to understand or impact a policy. (Civic Interpersonal Skills: Collaboration/Teamwork).
  3. Analyze both how and why media messages are constructed, and for what purposes in order to support a stance or opinion on an issue. (Professional Skills: Information Literacy)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What is the meaning of civic participation in a democratic republic?
  2. How can citizens act individually and collectively as a “check” on government?
  3. What strategies can citizens use most effectively to influence public policy?
  4. How do people remain civil and engage in discourse when there is dissonance?
  5. Why should you participate in government?
  6. What kinds of participation would be most effective on the policy issues you care about the most?
  7. In what ways can you actively engage in American democracy and impact its system of government?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Civics:

  1. Civic-minded individuals research civic issues and act appropriately using a variety of sources from multiple perspectives and communicating views in a respectful manner.
  2. Civic-minded individuals write letters to stakeholders using logical reasoning with relevant, accurate data and evidence to influence policy.
  3. Civic-minded individuals can verbally express their position on issues involving their community and/or nation in meaningful and thoughtful ways. For example: citizens speak at a school board meeting or running for office.
  4. Civic-minded individuals can listen to multiple perspectives in a respectful manner, as part of civil discourse.
  5. Civic-minded individuals can work effectively individually, and in groups, to influence public policy and the actions of government.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Decision-making involves researching an issue, listening to multiple perspectives, and weighing potential consequences of alternative actions. For example: citizens study the issues before voting.
  2. Participation in a local, state, tribal, or national issue involves research, planning, and implementing appropriate civic engagement.
  3. Social media can be a tool for researching civic issues, advocating for ideas, and expressing views to elected officials.
  4. Conduct research by gathering, organizing, and evaluating the credibility and bias of information from a variety of online, print, and non-print sources.
  5. Seek information from varied sources and perspectives to develop informed opinions and creative solutions.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to locate, evaluate, and apply sources in order to formulate descriptive evidence, including but not limited to the use of social media as a form of communication.
  7. Demonstrate ability to use 21st century media as a tool for civic participation.
  8. Critically analyze messages in the media to detect propaganda, censorship, and bias.
  9. Demonstrate appropriate behaviors when using technology and discuss consequences of inappropriate use.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 8. Analyze the origins, structures, and functions of governments to evaluate the impact on citizens and the global society.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Purposes, roles and limitations of the structures and functions of government.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Describe the origins, foundations, purposes, and limitations of government and include the contribution of key philosophers, American historical figures and documents.
  2. Identify the structure, function, and roles of current members of American government and their relationship to democratic values.
  3. Analyze and explain the importance of the principles of democracy and the inherent competition among values. For example: freedom and security, individual rights and common good, general welfare, and rights and responsibilities.
  4. Analyze the role of the founding documents of the United States and the evolution of their interpretation through governmental action and court cases. For example: the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Federalist Papers, and the Bill of Rights.
  5. Understand the role of the American judicial system and evaluate the effectiveness of the justice system in protecting life, liberty, and property for all persons in the United States.
  6. Analyze how current global issues impact American foreign policy. For example: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, immigration, or foreign trade agreements.
  7. Compare and contrast how other systems of government function. For example: authoritarian regimes and parliamentary systems.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Articulate thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills regarding the role and responsibilities of different levels and types government. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Communication)
  2. Interpret information and draw conclusions about the origins of the structures of America’s governmental institutions. (Entrepreneurial Skills: Critical Thinking/Problem Solving)
  3. Apply knowledge of government to develop appropriate and workable solutions that address complex local, state, national and global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Global/Cultural Awareness)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the most important democratic ideals and practices?
  2. What are the various levels and roles of the U.S. system of government?
  3. What would society look like if several landmark court cases had been decided differently?
  4. How does government best protect individual rights and the rights of minorities, yet have majority rule?
  5. In what ways can you actively engage in American democracy and impact its system of government?
  6. What would United States government look like with no checks and balances or another mix of those limitations?
  7. How has American federalism evolved and changed over time?
  8. How has the concept of American Democracy developed throughout history?
  9. How have domestic and foreign policy impacted American Democracy?
  10. Why should U.S. citizens be informed of issues related to foreign governments?
  11. Who are the elected officials who impact your life and how?
  12. What are a U.S. citizen's rights and responsibilities?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Civics:

  1. Civic-minded individuals know the facts and subject matter of the United States Citizenship test, the test that all foreign nationals must pass before becoming a U.S. citizen.
  2. Civic-minded individuals understand the concept of "rule of law" and its role in policies and practices of the government.
  3. Civic-minded individuals know the political theories that contributed to the foundation and development of the structures of government and their meaning today.
  4. Civic-minded individuals understand how the U.S. system of government functions at the local, state, tribal, and federal level in respect to separation of powers and checks and balances and their impact on policy.
  5. Civic-minded individuals understand the effectiveness of government institutions and the limits on government in addressing social and political problems.
  6. Civic-minded individuals gather and analyze data from multiple sources to look for patterns and create hypotheses regarding national and foreign policy.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Ask meaningful questions to analyze and evaluate information and ideas.
  2. Determine central ideas in a text to provide an accurate summary and connect the relationship between key details and ideas.
  3. Cite specific textual evidence to support the analysis of primary and secondary sources to gain insight into the text as a whole.
  4. Integrate multiple perspectives to gain a coherent understanding of the whole.
  5. Seek information from varied sources and perspectives to develop informed opinions and creative solutions.
  6. Use media literacy skills to locate multiple valid sources of information regarding the foundations, structures, and functions of government.
  7. Write content-specific arguments in which they state a claim, provide evidence from texts and sources to support the claim, and organize the evidence in well-reasoned, meaningful ways.
  8. Synthesize information from multiple sources to demonstrate understanding of a topic.
  9. Delineate a speaker’s argument, identify specific claims, and distinguish if claims are supported by reasons and evidence.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 7. Express an understanding of how civic participation affects policy by applying the rights and responsibilities of a citizen.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

3. Evaluate the impact of the political institutions that link the people to the government.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Assess how members of a civil society can impact public policy on local, state, tribal, national, or international issues. For example: voting, participation in primaries and general elections, and contact with elected officials.
  2. Examine and evaluate the effectiveness of political parties, interest groups, suffrage, and social movements as a way for people to participate and influence government.
  3. Analyze the impact of federal policies on campaigns and elections, and why these policies are debated by multiple parties on the political spectrum. For example: PACs, campaign finance, state and federal voting laws and regulations, and the Federal Election Commission.
  4. Analyze how court decisions, legislative debates, and various groups have helped to preserve, develop, interpret, and limit the individual rights and ideals of the American system of government.
  5. Examine how people in other systems of government can participate to influence policy.

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills:

  1. Analyze both how and why media messages are constructed, and for what purpose. (Professional Skills: Information Literacy)
  2. Participate effectively in civic life through the use of linkage institutions. For example: media, political parties, campaigns, interest groups. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Civic Engagement).
  3. Apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues in many contexts including the access and use of information. For example: campaign finance laws, and Freedom of Information Act. (Civic/Interpersonal Skills: Character)

More information icon Inquiry Questions:

  1. What are the different ways citizens can impact public policy as individuals or through groups?
  2. How have voting rights evolved over time?
  3. What current issues surround voting rights?
  4. What are interest groups and how do they influence policy?
  5. How have federal elections changed over time and how do the political parties view these changes?
  6. How have political parties responded to societal changes over time?
  7. How has the participation of different demographic groups changed over time in the U.S. and how has this influenced American politics and the system of government?

More information icon Nature and Skills of Civics:

  1. Civic-minded individuals use appropriate deliberative processes in multiple settings, such as caucuses, civic organizations, or advocating for change at the local, state, tribal, national or international levels.
  2. Civic-minded individuals analyze the impact and the appropriate roles of personal interests and perspectives on the application of civic virtues, democratic principles, constitutional rights, and human rights.
  3. Civic-minded individuals evaluate citizens’ and institutions’ effectiveness in addressing social and political problems at the local, state, tribal, national, and/or international levels.
  4. Civic-minded individuals evaluate social and political systems in different contexts, times, and places, that promote civic virtues and enact democratic principles.
  5. Civic-minded individuals analyze how people can use civic organizations, and social networks, including media to challenge local, state, tribal, national, and international laws that address a variety of public issues.
  6. Civic-minded individuals analyze historical, contemporary, and emerging means of changing societies, promoting the common good, and protecting rights.
  7. Civic-minded individuals evaluate multiple procedures for making and influencing governmental decisions at the local, state, tribal, national, and international levels in terms of the civic purposes achieved.
  8. Civic-minded individuals can work effectively, both individually and in groups, to influence public policy and the actions of government.

More information icon Disciplinary, Information, and Media Literacy:

  1. Understand strategies that are used by political and civic entities to impact public opinion. For example: interest groups, lobbying, political party platforms, social media networks, etc.
  2. Identify how political issues are covered by the media, and how the media can influence public policy.
  3. Identify ways in which 21st century media can be evaluated for authenticity, validity, and reliability.
  4. Evaluate the use of social media and crowdsourcing in political movements and campaigns.
  5. Analyze content-specific texts to distinguish the factual evidence offered, reasoned judgments made and conclusions drawn, and speculative ideas offered in the text.
  6. Synthesize information from multiple sources to demonstrate understanding of a topic.
  7. Present arguments or information in a logical sequence with a clear claim, supportive evidence, and effective presence that builds credibility.

Need Help? Submit questions or requests for assistance to bruno_j@cde.state.co.us