2020 Colorado Academic Standards

2020 Colorado Academic Standards Online

Use the options below to create customized views of the 2020 Colorado Academic Standards. For all standards resources, see the Office of Standards and Instructional Support.

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clear Content Area: Science // Grade Level: Fifth Grade // Standard Category: 1. Physical Science

Science

Fifth Grade, Standard 1. Physical Science

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Students can use the full range of science and engineering practices to make sense of natural phenomena and solve problems that require understanding structure, properties and interactions of matter.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

1. Matter exists as particles that are too small to be seen; measurements of a variety of observable properties can be used to identify particular materials.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. (5-PS1-1) (Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence supporting a model could include adding air to expand a basketball, compressing air in a syringe, dissolving sugar in water and evaporating salt water. Does not include the atomic-scale mechanism of evaporation and condensation or defining the unseen particles.)
  2. Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties. (5-PS1-3) (Clarification Statement: Examples of materials to be identified could include baking soda and other powders, metals, minerals and liquids. Examples of properties could include color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces and solubility; density is not intended as an identifiable property. Does not include density or distinguishing mass and weight.) (Boundary Statement: At this grade level, mass and weight are not distinguished, and no attempt is made to define the unseen particles or explain the atomic-scale mechanism of evaporation and condensation.)

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills and Science and Engineering Practices:

  1. Use models to describe phenomena (Developing and Using Models) (Personal: Initiative/Self-direction).
  2. Make observations and measurements to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon (Planning and Carrying Out Investigations) (Personal: Personal responsibility).

More information icon Elaboration on the GLE:

  1. Students can answer the question: How do particles combine to form the variety of matter one observes?
  2. PS1:A Structure and Properties of Matter: Matter of any type can be subdivided into particles that are too small to see, but even then the matter still exists and can be detected by other means. A model showing that gases are made from matter particles that are too small to see and are moving freely around in space can explain many observations, including the inflation and shape of a balloon and the effects of air on larger particles or objects. Measurements of a variety of properties can be used to identify materials.

More information icon Cross Cutting Concepts:

  1. Scale, Proportion and Quantity: Natural objects exist from the very small to the immensely large. Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, time, temperature and volume.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Students can use the full range of science and engineering practices to make sense of natural phenomena and solve problems that require understanding structure, properties and interactions of matter.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

2. Chemical Reactions that occur when substances are mixed can be identified by the emergence of substances with different properties; the total mass remains the same.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved. (5-PS1-1) (Clarification Statement: Examples of reactions or changes could include phase changes, dissolving and mixing that form new substances. Does not include distinguishing mass and weight.) (Boundary Statement: Mass and weight are not distinguished at this grade level.)
  2. Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances. (5-PS1-4)

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills and Science and Engineering Practices:

  1. Measure and graph quantities such as weight to address scientific and engineering questions and problems (Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking) (Entrepreneurial: Critical thinking/Problem solving).

More information icon Elaboration on the GLE:

  1. Students can answer the questions: How do substances combine or change (react) to make new substances? How does one characterize and explain these reactions and make predictions about them?
  2. PS1:B Chemical Reactions: No matter what reaction or change in properties occurs, the total weight of the substances does not change. (Boundary Statement: Mass and weight are not distinguished at this grade level.) When two or more different substances are mixed, a new substance with different properties may be formed.

More information icon Cross Cutting Concepts:

  1. Scale, Proportion and Quantity: Standard units are used to measure and describe physical quantities such as weight, time, temperature and volume.
  2. Scientific Knowledge to Assumes an Order and Consistency in Natural Systems: Science assumes consistent patterns in natural systems.
  3. Cause and Effect: Cause - and - effect relationships are routinely identified, tested and used to explain change.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Students can use the full range of science and engineering practices to make sense of natural phenomena and solve problems that require understanding structure, properties and interactions of matter.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

3. The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth's surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down. (5-PS2-1) (Clarification Statement: “Down” is a local description of the direction that points toward the center of the spherical Earth.) (Boundary Statement: Does not include mathematical representation of gravitational force).

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills and Science and Engineering Practices:

  1. Support an argument with evidence, data or a model (Engaging in Argument from Evidence) (Personal: Initiative/Self-direction).

More information icon Elaboration on the GLE:

  1. Students can answer the question: What underlying forces explain the variety of interactions observed?
  2. PS2:B Types of Interactions: The gravitational force of Earth acting on an object near Earth’s surface pulls that object toward the planet’s center.

More information icon Cross Cutting Concepts:

  1. Cause and Effect: Cause - and - effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change.

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More information icon Prepared Graduates:

  • 1. Students can use the full range of science and engineering practices to make sense of natural phenomena and solve problems that require understanding structure, properties and interactions of matter.

More information icon Grade Level Expectation:

4. The energy released from food was once energy from the sun.

More information icon Evidence Outcomes:

Students Can:

  1. Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth and motion and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun. (5-PS3-1) (Clarification Statement: Examples of models could include diagrams and flowcharts.)

More information icon Academic Contexts and Connections:

More information icon Colorado Essential Skills and Science and Engineering Practices:

  1. Use models to describe phenomena (Developing and Using Models) (Personal: Initiative/Self-direction).

More information icon Elaboration on the GLE:

  1. Students can answer the questions: How do food and fuel provide energy? If energy is conserved, why do people say it is produced or used?
  2. PS3:D Energy in Chemical Processes and Everyday Life: The energy released from food was once energy from the sun that was captured by plants in the chemical process that forms plant matter (from air and water).

More information icon Cross Cutting Concepts:

  1. Energy and Matter: Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.

Need Help? Submit questions or requests for assistance to bruno_j@cde.state.co.us