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About Homeless Education

These webpages are designed to give an overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act and the programs run through Title IX, part A of Every Student Succeeds Act in Colorado. They also provide specific resources and information for school district liaisons and other audiences to ensure access to a free and appropriate public education for homeless children and youth, and success in school once enrolled.

The Homeless Education program is authorized under Title VII-B of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 USC 11431 et seq.). The McKinney-Vento Act was enacted to address the numerous barriers homeless children face in obtaining a free, appropriate public education.

The program was originally authorized in 1987 and, most recently, reauthorized as Title IX, Part A of the Every Student Succeeds Act. The Act ensures educational rights and protections for children and youth experiencing homelessness including the following:

  • The right to immediate enrollment in school, even if lacking paperwork normally required for enrollment.
  • The right to attend school in his/her school of origin, if in the child or youth’s best interest, or if the school in the attendance area where the family or youth is currently residing.
  • The right to receive transportation to his/her school of origin, if this is requested by the parent or unaccompanied youth.

  • The right to services comparable to those received by household schoolmates, including transportation and supplemental educational services.
  • The right to attend school along with children not experiencing homelessness. Segregation based on a student's status as homeless is strictly prohibited.
  • The posting of homeless students’ rights in all schools and other places around the community.

 

Education Week's Feature

CDE’s State Coordinator for Homeless Education, Kerry Wrenick, is featured in Education Week’s inaugural edition of “10 Big Ideas in Education.” This is a special report exploring game-changing disruptions to the field of education that have the potential to shake up the schoolhouse and the classroom. Presented in no particular order, they are meant to stir conversation or prompt you to think about your work in a new way. https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/01/10/how-one-district-cut-student-homelessness-by.html

Denver Post Feature

Dana Scott worked with Jennifer Brown from the Denver Post on an article illustrating the impacts of homelessness on students’ lives, including their education. The article also provides information on the McKinney-Vento Act and the educational rights of homeless students.