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Migrant Education Program (MEP) FAQ

Advisory Councils and Committees
Frequently Asked Questions From The Draft Non-Regulatory Guidance

 

Description
The Frequently Asked Questions section of the Migrant Education Program web site provides responses to comments and questions from our regional program staff on Eligibility, Identification and Recruitment. We encourage comments or other questions that may arise as a result of the mobility of our migrant students and families. Please note that responses to the questions also reference the October 2003 Draft Non-Regulatory Guidance issued by the Office of Migrant Education.

PLEASE NOTE:
COMEPG = Colorado Migrant Education Program Guidance.
NRG = Non-Regulatory Guidance


Child Eligibility

Definition: Children are eligible to receive MEP services if they meet the definition of "migratory child" and if the basis for their eligibility is properly recorded on a certificate of eligibility (COE) or other written or electronic form. The term "migratory child" is defined in section 1309(2) of the statute and section 200.81(d) of the regulations. The definition of a "migratory child" is also listed in Section II-A1 of the Draft Non-Regulatory Guidance. Determining whether a child meets this definition is often difficult and depends on a recruiter's assessment of information presented by a parent or other family member, guardian, or other individual responsible for the child.

If a parent has a job for nine months in the fields – would they qualify? What should the child’s QAD be?

COMEPG: The date the child joins the parent is the eligibility date. NRG: E2, Page 17 What is the “to join” date? In situations where the child and parent do not move together, the “to join” date is the day that the child and worker complete the move to be together. If the child’s move precedes the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date that the worker arrived. The reason for this is that a move does not qualify until the worker arrives in the school district and begins to seek qualifying work. Therefore, it is only at this point that the child meets the definition of “migratory child.” On the other hand, if the child’s move followed the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date the child arrived. The reason for this is that the child does not establish eligibility as a migrant child until he or she physically arrives in the receiving school district. NRG: E3, Page 17Is there a time limit on “to join” moves? No. However, the SEA should establish a reasonable time limit for “to join” moves. If the SEA has not established a time limit, the recruiter should determine what is reasonable based on the circumstances. As a rule of thumb, the child’s move should occur within a year of the worker’s move. After one year, it is difficult to establish a credible relationship between the child’s move and the worker’s move. Nonetheless, there may be unusual circumstances that may prevent a child from moving within 12 months of the worker’s move. In that case, the SEA should document the basis for determining that the child is eligible even after a prolonged period of time between the two moves.

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Does a child’s education being interrupted determine if a family qualifies?

COMEPG: – The child must have made a move with parents for family to qualify. NRG: A1(5), Page 9 What is the definition of “migratory child”? The Child:

a. Has moved from one school district to another; or

b. In a State that is comprised of a single school district, has moved from one administrative area to another within such district; or

c. Resides in a school district of more than 15,000 square miles and migrates a distance of 20 miles or more to a temporary residence to engage in a fishing activity. (This provision currently applies only to Alaska.)

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Do all children in Exceptional Student Services qualify?

COMEPG: Yes, all children in Exceptional Student Services qualify through the age of 21. NRG: A1(1), Page 9 What is the definition of “migratory child”? The child is younger than 22 and has not graduated from high school or does not hold a high school equivalency certificate (this means that the child is entitled to a free public education or is of an age below compulsory school attendance).

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 Why are migrant children (Age 0 through 2) excluded from the funding formula?

COMEPG: All migrant children ages 0-21 can receive instructional and support services. OME’s policy states that pre-school to 21 who attend school are eligible for funding. Migrant children 0-2 are eligible for funding through the Migrant Even Start Program, but not through Title I, Part C. NRG: Not Applicable.

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 If a parent is younger than 22, who all qualifies - Mother, father and child?

COMEPG: All qualify as long as the parents are under the age of 22 and are doing qualifying work. NRG: A1(2),Page 9 What is the definition of “migratory child”? The child is a migrant agricultural worker or a migrant fisher or has a parent, spouse, or guardian who is a migrant agricultural worker or a migrant fisher.

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 Do children have to be officially withdrawn from school to re-qualify if they move back to area? What if they just leave – miss school for six months and then move back, but were never withdrawn?

COMEPG: No, they do not have to be “officially” withdrawn from school. However, they must cross district boundaries and establish temporary residence in order to re-qualify. NRG: A1(5), Page 9What is the definition of “migratory child”? The Child:

a. Has moved from one school district to another; or

b. In a State that is comprised of a single school district, has moved from one administrative area to another within such district; or

c. Resides in a school district of more than 15,000 square miles and migrates a distance of 20 miles or more to a temporary residence to engage in a fishing activity. (This provision currently applies only to Alaska.)

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 What if children moved to be with a parent who has lived in area working in irrigation for four years, but children are new to area - do they qualify?

COMEPG: No, the family is past their three year eligibility date. NRG: A1(3), Page 9 What is the definition of “migratory child?” The child has moved within the preceding 36 months in order to obtain (or seek) or to accompany (or join) a parent, spouse, or guardian to obtain (or seek), temporary or seasonal employment in qualifying agricultural or fishing work.

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Qualifying Move

Explain/Clarify “Very Short Distance.” EXAMPLE: I live in Denver and move 15 miles from my residence to my new residence – have not crossed district boundaries. Does my move qualify? Can this be considered a “Very Short Distance?”

COMEPG: No, the family must have moved from one school district to another. NRG: C6, Page 13 Is there a minimum duration for a qualifying move? Yes. The move must be sufficiently long to establish that the qualifying work is a principal means of livelihood and to establish residency. In cases where the worker sought but did not obtain qualifying work, the recruiter should document why he or she believes the work would have been a principal means of livelihood. (For more information on principal means of livelihood, please see Questions J1 through J8 of this chapter.)

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How do we ask the question to determine if the move involves permanent relocation?

COMEPG: Determine the primary purpose of the move. NRG: C4, Page 12 What is a permanent relocation? A permanent relocation is a move that is made without the intent to move again. (See Question F3 of this chapter if the move is from a non-contiguous country to the United States.) NRG: F3, Page 18 – May a move to the U. S. from a country other than Mexico or Canada be considered a qualifying move? It depends. A move from a country other than Mexico or Canada qualifies if the primary purpose of the move was to enable the child, parent, guardian or spouse to obtain temporary or seasonal employment in an agricultural or fishing activity. However, most of these moves do not qualify because the move is a permanent relocation to the United States for political or other personal reasons. Recruiters should be careful in making these determinations and should document in the comment section of the COE the basis for their decision.

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 Is there a 30 day wait from when a family leaves an area to when they return and re-qualify?

COMEPG: There is no waiting period. The family has to cross district boundaries and intend to do agricultural work. NRG: C2, Page 12 What is involved in a qualifying move “from one school district to another”? A qualifying move from one school district to another involves a move across established school district boundaries and a change in residence. In a State that is comprised of a single school district (District of Columbia, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico) the move must be from one administrative area to another. In a State where school districts are more than miles or more to a temporary residence to engage in a fishing activity. NRG: C7, Page 13Is there a minimum distance requirement for a qualifying move? No. The only requirement is that the move be across school district boundaries to establish a new residence and to enable the worker to seek or obtain qualifying work. However, if the move is of a very short distance, the recruiter should explain in the comment section of the COE the basis for determining that the move qualifies. (See Question M5 of this chapter). Also note that special distance provisions apply to moves in school districts that are more than 15,000 square miles.

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 What if the family does not know whether the move will be temporary or permanent?

COMEPG: The recruiter has to determine the primary purpose for moving. NRG: D5, Page 15 What if the worker asserts more than one reason for moving to a particular school district? A worker who asserts more than one reason for moving made a qualifying move if the recruiter determines that the primary purpose for the worker’s move was to seek or obtain COE the basis for his or her determination.

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 A family moves from Denver to Denver across school district boundaries. Is this is considered a short distance move, what type of documentation would we need in the comment section?

COMEPG: Family crossed school district boundaries. NRG: C7, Page 13 Is there a minimum distance requirement for a qualifying move? No. The only requirement is that the move be across school district boundaries to establish a new residence and to enable the worker to seek or obtain qualifying work. However, if the move is of a very short distance, the recruiter should explain in the comment section of the COE the basis for determining that the move qualifies. (See Question M5 of this chapter). Also note that special distance provisions apply to moves in school districts that are more than 15,000 square miles.

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 What if the family does not know whether the move will be permanent – can we “assume” it is temporary?

COMEPG: A parent should be able to tell you if they truly plan to permanently relocate. NRG: C4, Page 12 What is permanent relocation? A permanent relocation is a move that is made without the intent to move again.

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Intent

Who do you audit? The person who signs the COE or the spouse?

COMEPG: We audit the person who signed the COE. NRG: Not Applicable.

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Can you have a menu of comments to document Intent and other necessary documentation?

COMEPG: This is on the revised COE NRG: Not Applicable.

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Does a worker qualify if they have a history of doing agricultural work in Mexico?

COMEPG: THIS IS A QUESTION BEING ASKED OF OME. NRG: THIS IS A QUESTION BEING ASKED OF OME.

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Does a family qualify if the geographic location clearly does not have the intended crop (i.e., oranges in Greeley?)

COMEPG: Yes, the family qualifies based on their intent. NRG: D7, Page 15 How may a recruiter evaluate whether the primary purpose of the worker’s move was to seek or obtain qualifying work? Recruiters should examine the facts and circumstances regarding the worker’s statements about the intent of the move and make a reasonable determination whether the statement is credible and supportable. For example, if a worker states that he moved to obtain qualifying work and the recruiter determines that he is engaged in such work, there is strong support for the worker’s statement. If, on the other hand, a worker states that he probe further and look at other factors to make a determination. The recruiter may examine such factors as: (1) whether the worker or family has a prior history of moving in order to perform qualifying work; (2) whether external circumstances (e.g., flood, crop failure, etc.) prevented the worker from obtaining the work; is available.

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Does a family qualify if they intend to work in agriculture, but there was no job position available?

COMEPG: Yes, the family qualifies based on their intent. NRG: D4, Page 14 What if the worker asserts that he moved with the intent to find qualifying work but did not obtain work? What if the worker asserts that he moved with the intent to find qualifying work but did not obtain work? In this situation, there is a presumption that the worker moved with the intent to obtain qualifying work: if: (1) the worker has a history of migrant employment, and (2) there is a corroborating evidence of the circumstances that prevented the worker from obtaining qualifying work (e.g., there was a flood or crop failure in the area). Absent these factors, the recruiter may find that the worker made a qualifying move based on other convincing evidence. In any event, the recruiter should clearly document in the comment section of the COE the basis for his or her determination. NRG: D7, Page 15 How may a recruiter evaluate whether the primary purpose of the worker’s move was to seek or obtain qualifying work? Recruiters should examine the facts and circumstances regarding the worker’s statements about the intent of the move and make a reasonable determination whether the statement is credible and supportable. For example, if a worker states that he moved to obtain qualifying work and he is not engaged in such work, there is strong support for the worker’s statement. If, on the other hand, a worker states that he moved to obtain qualifying work and he is not engaged in such work, the recruiter should probe further and look at other factors to make a determination. The recruiter may examine such factors as: (1) whether the worker or family has prior history of moving in order to perform qualifying work; (2) whether external circumstances (e.g., flood, crop failure, etc.) prevented the worker from obtaining the work; and (3) whether the worker’s geographic location is a place where such work is available.

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What if they don’t move to work in the fields? (under three years) Intent to work both jobs? Intent to just work the one and can’t make it – have to do field work to survive?

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What if a worker intends to work one job but also does field work to survive?

COMEPG: Yes, they qualify for survival. NRG: J3, Page 23 Are recruiters required to review income information to determine whether the qualifying work is PMOL for the family? No. However, through the interview process, the recruiter should be satisfied that the agricultural or fishing work in fact plays an important part of providing a living for the family. Absent obvious evidence to the contrary, the recruiter may rely on information the work, employer, or other relevant person provides and should make a sound judgment based on that information. In cases where the worker’s statements about the family’s reliance on the agricultural or fishing work does not seem reasonable (e.g., the household is also supported by family members engaged in non-qualifying work), the recruiter should either find the child ineligible or refer the situation to a higher official within the State.

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If there was stated intent to work in qualifying activity not in area, does the recruiter still qualify the family based on intent?

COMEPG: Yes, the family qualifies based on intent. NRG: D7, Page 15 How may a recruiter evaluate whether the primary purpose of the worker’s move was to seek or obtain qualifying work? Recruiters should examine the facts and circumstances regarding the worker’s statements about the intent of the move and make a reasonable determination whether the statement is credible and supportable. For example, if a worker states that he moved to obtain qualifying work and the recruiter determines that he is engaged in such work, there is strong support for the worker’s statement. If, on the other hand ,worker states that moved to obtain qualifying work and he is not engaged in such work, the recruiter should probe further and look at other factors to make a determination. The recruiter may examine such factors as: (1) whether the worker or family has a prior history of moving in order to perform qualifying work; (2) whether external-circumstances (e.g. flood, crop failure, etc.) prevented the worker from obtaining the work; and (3) whether the worker’s geographic location is place where such work is available.

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If a family settles here and intends to move for seasonal work to another state, do they qualify and, if so, where?

COMEPG: When they return to our state, you can qualify them on their intent to return to agricultural work. If the family plans to permanently locate they will qualify based on prior history. NRG: D2, Page 14Should a recruiter always determine the intent of a worker’s move? Yes. According to section 1309(2) of the statute, a move only qualifies if it is made “in order to obtain (or seek) temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing work.” The only way to determine whether this was the reason for the move is to determine the worker’s intent.

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If a person’s intention was to obtain a position in Agriculture, with no prior history, do they qualify?

COMEPG: Yes, the family qualifies based on intent. NRG: D2, Page 14 Should a recruiter always determine the intent of a worker’s move? Yes. According to section 1309(2) of the statute, a move only qualifies if it is made “in order to obtain (or seek) temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing work.” The only way to determine whether this was the reason for the move is to determine the worker’s intent

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Are recruiters required to ask about “Intent” when a family/person is currently working in agriculture?

COMEPG: Yes, they qualify strictly on intent. NRG: D3, Page 14 Should a recruiter ask a worker about the intent of his or her move if the worker is engaged in qualifying work? Yes. The fact that a worker moved and is engaged in qualifying work is not a presumption that the worker moved with the intent to obtain that work. Recruiters should always ask worker engaged in qualifying work whether they moved with the intent to seek or obtain that work.

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To Join

If we find a family in the Fall when the kids are here – but they came at different times, what QAD do we use?

COMEPG As long as it is within the three years of the parent’s qualifying activity work. The QAD will be when each child arrives. NRG: E2, Page 17 What is the “to join” date? In situations where the child and parent do not move together, the “to join” date is the day that the child and worker complete the move to be together. If the child’s move precedes the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date that the worker arrived. The reason for this is that a move does not qualify until the worker arrives in the school district and begins to seek qualifying work. Therefore, it is only at this point that the child meets the definition of “migratory child.” On the other hand, if the child’s move followed the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date the child arrived. The reason for this is that the child does not establish eligibility as a migrant child until he or she physically arrives in the receiving school district.

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 If a child joins their family and the child’s EOE is 3 years from the child’s arrival date or 3 years from the parents QAD?

COMEPG: Eligibility of the child is three years after they join their parents. Documentation reason “To Join” on the COE. NRG: C10, Page 13 May an SEA base a child’s eligibility on a qualifying move that occurred in another state within the past 36 months? Yes. The recruiter must record the date on which the qualifying move occurred and other information that establishes the child’s eligibility for the MEP. SEAs are also encouraged to call the State in which the qualifying move occurred to verify that the move qualified. The child is eligible for the MEP for the remainder of the 36-month period. NRG: E2, Page 17 What is the “to join” date? In situations where the child and parent do not move together, the “to join” date is the day that the child and worker complete the move to be together. If the child’s move precedes the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date that the worker arrived. The reason for this is that a move does not qualify until the worker arrives in the school district and begins to seek qualifying work. Therefore, it is only at this point that the child meets the definition of “migratory child.” On the other hand, if the child’s move followed the worker’s move, the qualifying arrival date is the date the child arrived. The reason for this is that the child does not establish eligibility as a migrant child until he or she physically arrives in the receiving school district. NRG: E3, Page 17 Is there a time limit on “to join” moves? No. However, the SEA should establish a reasonable time limit for “to join” moves. If the SEA has not established a time limit, the recruiter should determine what is reasonable based on the circumstances. As a rule of thumb, the child’s move should occur within a year of the worker’s move. After one year, it is difficult to establish a credible relationship between the child’s move and the worker’s move. Nonetheless, there may be unusual circumstances that may prevent a child from moving within 12 months of the worker’s move. In that case, the SEA should document the basis for determining that the child is eligible even after a prolonged period of time between the two moves.

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Agricultural and Fishing Activities

Do Ostrich, Llama, Alpaca, Elk, Buffalos and Emus qualify as domestic animals?

COMEPG: They qualify if they fit the livestock definition regarding breeding or slaughtering and use for personal subsistence. NRG: I4, Page 20 What is livestock? In general, livestock is any domestic animal produced or kept primarily for breeding or slaughter purposes, including beef and dairy cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, and horses. For purposes of the MEP, livestock does not include animals that are raised for sport, recreation, research, or pets. NRG: I13, Page 22 What does “personal subsistence” mean? Personal subsistence means that the worker and his or her family consume the crops, dairy products, or livestock they produce or the fish they catch in order to survive.

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Are horses considered livestock?

COMEPG: Horses are considered livestock if they meet the definition found in the NRG. NRG: I4, Page 20 What is livestock? In general, livestock is any domestic animal produced or kept primarily for breeding or slaughter purposes, including beef and dairy cattle, hogs, sheep, goats, and horses. …livestock does not include animals that are raised for sport, recreation, research, or pets.

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Further explain “Harvesting of Trees.”

COMEPG: Harvesting of trees include items as listed below from the NRG. NRG: I14, Page 22 What types of activities are “directly related to the cultivation or harvesting of trees”? Cultivation or harvesting of trees includes soil preparation, planting, tending, pruning, felling, and cutting.

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Does intent to work in a fish hatchery qualify?

COMEPG: Yes – unless the fish is used for recreational purposes. NRG: I17, Page 22What is a “fish farm”? A fish farm is a tract of water reserved for the cultivation of fish or shellfish, such as catfish, eels, oysters, or clams. The fish are artificially cultivated, rather than caught in open running water as they would be in a “fishing activity.”

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Production

Which of these activities qualify - Cleaning animal stalls? Doctoring animals? Shearing animals? Handling animals?

COMPEG: Cleaning – Yes. Doctoring – Yes, if the worker is not a Vet, yet is caring for animals. – Shearing - Yes. NOTE: Handling – We will request a more specific definition from OME regarding handling. NRG: I6, Page 21 What are some examples of work directly related to the production of livestock involves actively taking care of animals? According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the production of livestock involves actively taking care of animals. Such activities include: herding, handling, feeding, watering, caring for, branding, tagging, and assisting in the raising of livestock.

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Processing

If making cookies from flour doesn’t count, why would making tortillas from flour or corn count, or bread from flour?

COMEPG: Making cookies, tortillas or bread does not qualify. NRG: I11, Page 21 Are there circumstances where there may be two initial commercial sales associated with one crop? Yes. Because an initial commercial sale may occur at the conclusion of the production of a crop and at the conclusion of processing that crop into a more refined product, there may be situations where there are two initial commercial sales. For example, wheat is harvested and sold to a factory for processing the wheat into flour. The sale of the wheat to the factory is the initial commercial sale of a crop to the processor. This sale ends the production phase of the crop. The factory then processes the wheat into flour and sells the flour to a bakery. The sale of the flour to the bakery is an initial commercial sale of a processed product (flour) to a next-stage processor and ends the processing phase as a qualifying agricultural activity. Harvesting the wheat and processing the wheat into flour both meet the definition of “agricultural activity” because they are the production and processing of a crop for initial commercial sale.

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 Does the processing have to be at one factory - orchard to cider/juice plant?

COMEPG: The process could take place at more than one factory as long as they are handling the raw product at each factory. NRG: I11, Page 21Are there circumstances where there may be two initial commercial sales associated with one crop? Yes. Because an initial commercial sale may occur at the conclusion of the production of a crop and at the conclusion of processing that crop into a more refined product, there may be situations where there are two initial commercial sales. For example, wheat is harvested and sold to a factory for processing the wheat into flour. The sale ends the production phase of the crop. The factory then processes the wheat into flour and sells the flour to a bakery. The sale of the flour to the bakery is an initial commercial sale of a processed product (flour) to a next-stage processor and ends the processing phase as a qualifying agricultural activity. Harvesting the wheat and processing the wheat into flour processing of a crop for initial commercial sale.

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Would packaging and labeling in a meat packing plant qualify?

COMEPG: Yes, packaging and labeling is part of processing. NRG: I8, Page 21 What are some examples of activities that are directly related to processing? According to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, processing includes: cooking, baking, curing, heating, drying, mixing, grinding, churning, separating, extracting, slaughtering, cutting, fermenting, distilling, eviscerating, preserving, dehydrating, freezing, chilling, packaging, canning, jarring, or otherwise enclosing food in a container. OME adopts this definition as those activities that are directly related to processing.

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Do Tortillerias and Panaderias qualify?

COMEPG: No, this is considered second stage processing. NRG: I12, Page 22 What is “second-stage” processing? Second-stage processing occurs after a processed product is sold to the next-stage processor for further refinement. In the example above, using the flour to bake cookies would be second-stage processing because the first stage of processing occurred when the wheat was processed into flour. In this case, any work performed at the bakery does not meet the definition of “agricultural activity” because there was an initial commercial sale of a processed product when the flour was sold to the bakery.

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In what way would baking and cooking qualify?

COMEPG: Baking and cooking would qualify if they are working with the raw product. CLARIFICATION WILL BE OBTAINED FROM OME. NRG: I8, Page 21What are some examples of activities that are directly related to processing? According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, processing includes: cooking, baking, curing, heating, drying, mixing, grinding, churning, separating, extracting, slaughtering, cutting, fermenting, distilling, eviscerating, preserving, dehydrating, freezing, chilling, packaging, canning, jarring, or otherwise enclosing food in a container. OME adopts this definition as those activities that are directly related to processing.

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Primary Means of Livelihood

Dad makes a good amount of money in construction. Mom makes little money in Agriculture. Is mom’s income part of PMOL?

COMEPG: No, Mom’s income is not important to the families' PMOL. NRG: J1, Page 23 What does PMOL mean? PMOL means that an agricultural or fishing activity plays an important part in providing a living for the worker and his or her family. 34 CFR 200.8.1 (f). This regulation means that child who meets all other aspects of the definition of a migrant child is not eligible to be counted or served by the MEP unless the temporary or seasonal agricultural or fishing work is in fact an important part of their livelihood. Children whose parents do not rely on this work for their livelihood are not migrant children under the MEP and, therefore, may not be found eligible or receive program services.

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How do we ask the question about PMOL?

COMPEG: Please see NRG definition below. NRG: J4, Page 23 What types of questions should recruiters ask parents to determine whether a child is eligible on the basis of PMOL? Recruiters should ask parents questions like:

  • At the time of the move, were you employed? What did you do?
  • Was anyone else in your household employed? What did they do?
  • How many dependents are in the household?
  • To what extent did your family rely on this job for basic necessities?
  • Is the income from your other jobs enough to support your family?

NRG: J6, Page 24 What are some examples of determining PMOL? A parent is a commercial fisher during the summer, but also works as a janitor in the school the remainder of the year. When the recruiter visits the parent, she asks him “Is this fishing work really important for providing a living for your family”? The parent tells her that, without the revenue he earns from fishing, he doesn’t know how his family would make ends meet. Based on his verbal affirmation and the recruiter’s belief that his statement is credible, she concludes that fishing is an important part of providing a living for the family. The child is eligible for the MEP on the basis of PMOL

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Regarding PMOL, where do we document this on the COE’s -under “Comments”? Do we put percentages, or what do we write?

COMEPG: This is stated on the revised COE. NRG: Not Applicable.

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If student moves from one school district to another to join family and to work on a dairy farm milking cows, how does PMOL apply? Is she eligible on her own if she buys own clothing and gas money for school?

COMEPG: The student qualifies on the basis of their intent to join the family to do agricultural work. NRG: A1(5), Page 9 What is the definition of “migratory child”? The Child:

a. Has moved from one school district to another, or

b. In a State that is comprised of a single school district, has moved from one administrative area to another within such district; or

c. Resides in a school district of more than 15,000 square miles and migrates a distance of 20 miles or more to a temporary residence to engage in a fishing activity. (This provision currently applies only to Alaska.)

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Other

Why do we need Home Base on the COE?

COMEPG: Identifying the “home base” will assist us with identifying their migrant pattern and history. NRG: Not Applicable.

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Very few schools provide materials in Spanish.

COMEPG: When the school provides instruction in Spanish or teacher support in Spanish, the school may request funds for materials from the MEP, Title III, Title I, or ELPA. NRG: Not Applicable.

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We would like a guide list/menu of comments that could be used to document intent and other necessary documentation.

COMEPG: This is documented on the revised COE. NRG: Not Applicable

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Should recruiters, looking for intent to qualify, describe the program benefits prior to asking qualifying questions?

COMEPG: No. Because parents may be disappointed that they do not qualify for direct services, it is best to describe the different types of services that can be proved after the recruiter can certify their eligibility. Initially the recruiter can describe who we represent and how we work with schools and community agencies. The recruiter can describe some examples of the support we provide to families in collaboration with the school and agency.

Although they may not qualify, we can maintain some support to them by referring them to service providers and agencies. The referral process can continue as long as they communicate their needs to MEP staff. NRG: Not Applicable.

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Does a person qualify if they hold a high school diploma from another country?

COMEPG: No.

Students who are at least 21 years of age and who;

  • Are eligible migrant students, and
  • Have graduated from a high school in Mexico, and
  • Have not graduated with diploma from U.S. or have a GED,

can enroll in a U.S. high school provided that the district has a policy that they can enroll to earn a High School Diploma or GED. These students can receive direct MEP services. NRG: Not Applicable.

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